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I need to surround the following sql script with an if statment that checks the existence of one table. There's a lot more fields to the statement but the snippet below should be enough to get the idea.

If I surround this whole batch with an if statement it doesn't like that i have GOs between if statments. If i take out the GOs it complains about TMP_FIELD being an invalid column.

What are some ways to do this the right way? All i'm doing is taking a bunch of fields and changing from varchar to datetime. This is part of a setup.exe file so I just need it to run once and not for future upgrades. The way I determine that is if a certain table exists then don't run the script.

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE ADD TMP_FIELD datetime
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  UPDATE MY_TABLE SET TMP_FIELD = modifiedDate
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE DROP COLUMN modifiedDate
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE ADD modifiedDate datetime
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  UPDATE MY_TABLE SET modifiedDate = TMP_FIELD
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'MY_TABLE') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
  ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE DROP COLUMN TMP_FIELD
GO
share|improve this question
    
When I take out the GOs, I get an error about modifiedDate. Did you mean? "If i take out the GOs it complains about modifiedDate being an invalid column." –  Adam Porad Mar 19 '12 at 15:32
    
TMP_FIELD is invalid column. –  Rod Mar 19 '12 at 15:49
    
I think I defined the table MY_TABLE differently when I was testing. I did not include the column modifiedData in the table schema. I didn't read the example very closely at first, so I didn't grok the schema of the original table that you're working with. –  Adam Porad Mar 19 '12 at 15:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't really need to do all that gymnastic for changing the type of a column, do you?

create table MY_TABLE (
    modifiedDate varchar(20)
)
go

insert MY_TABLE (modifiedDate) values ('2012-10-20 17:50:41')
go

select * from MY_TABLE
go

alter table MY_TABLE alter column modifiedDate datetime
go

select * from MY_TABLE
go

drop table MY_TABLE
go

So, I would write your statement like this:

if exists (select table_name from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES where TABLE_NAME = 'MY_TABLE')
begin
  alter table MY_TABLE alter column modifiedDate datetime
end
share|improve this answer

The GOs mark the end of a batch of TSQL statements. You can't mix DDL (data definition language) statements like ALTER TABLE with DML (data manipulation language) statements like UPDATE TABLE in the same batch.

Each batch is compiled on it's own. So when the ALTER TABLE and UPDATE TABLE statements are in the same batch, SQL Server can't compile the update statement because the column modifiedData hasn't actually been created yet.

share|improve this answer
    
so how do you put a condition around a group of batches? –  Rod Mar 19 '12 at 16:32

If you want to get around 'Invalid column ..' errors, one option is to use dynamic SQL. e.g. :

create table dbo.t1 (id int primary key, cola varchar(20))
go

insert dbo.t1 values (1, 'one')
insert dbo.t1 values (2, 'two')   
go

if not exists(select  * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS where TABLE_NAME = 't1' and COLUMN_NAME = 'colb')
BEGIN
    -- add new column 'colb', and set its value initially to existing values in 'cola' 
    ALTER TABLE dbo.t1 ADD colb varchar(20)

    DECLARE @v NVARCHAR(500)
    SET @v = N'UPDATE dbo.t1 SET colb = cola'
    EXEC (@v) -- use dynamic SQL, otherwise will get Invalid column name colb error.    
END
GO

Note that dynamic SQL should be considered a last resort. David Brabant's answer seems to be the way to go for your original problem.

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