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I'm using Simple Form here, but this is an issue with normal Rails forms, too. When using shallow routes, form_for needs different arguments depending in what context it's used.

Example: For editing (http://localhost:3000/notes/2/edit), _form.html.erb needs to have simple_form_for(@note). But for creating a new note (http://localhost:3000/customers/2/notes/new) _form.html.erb needs simple_form_for([@customer, @note]). If either receives the wrong arguments, I'll get a method not found error.

What's the best way to deal with this?

  • I could make two separate forms, but that seems messy.
  • I have to set @customer for the back link, but I could use a different variable in the form (say, @customer_form) and just not set it in the edit and update methods, but that's inconsistent and slightly confusing, since I'd have to set both @customer_form and @customer in the new method.
  • I could do what this guy did and split the form up across multiple files. It looks like the best option so far, but I don't really like it much, since you can't just open _form.html.erb and see what's happening.

Are these my only options?

Example follows:

config/routes.rb

Billing::Application.routes.draw do
  resources :customers, :shallow => true do
    resources :notes
  end
end

rake routes | grep note

    customer_notes GET    /customers/:customer_id/notes(.:format)         notes#index
                   POST   /customers/:customer_id/notes(.:format)         notes#create
 new_customer_note GET    /customers/:customer_id/notes/new(.:format)     notes#new
         edit_note GET    /notes/:id/edit(.:format)                       notes#edit
              note GET    /notes/:id(.:format)                            notes#show
                   PUT    /notes/:id(.:format)                            notes#update
                   DELETE /notes/:id(.:format)                            notes#destroy

app/views/notes/_form.html.erb

#                      v----------------------------- Right here
<%= simple_form_for (@note), html: { class: 'form-vertical'} do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :content %>

  <%= f.button :submit %>
<% end -%>

app/views/notes/new.html.erb

<h1>New note</h1>

<%= render 'form' %>

<%= link_to 'Back', customer_path(@customer) %>

app/views/notes/edit.html.erb

<h1>Editing note</h1>

<%= render 'form' %>

<%= link_to 'Show', @note %>
<%= link_to 'Back', customer_path(@customer) %>

app/controllers/notes_controller.rb

class NotesController < ApplicationController

def show
  @note = Note.find(params[:id])
  @customer = Customer.find(@note.customer_id) 

  respond_to do |format|
    format.html
    format.json {render json: @note }
  end
end

  # GET /notes/new
  # GET /notes/new.json
  def new
    @note = Note.new
    @customer = Customer.find(params[:customer_id])

    respond_to do |format|
      format.html # new.html.erb
      format.json { render json: @note }
    end
  end

  # GET /notes/1/edit
  def edit
    @note = Note.find(params[:id])
    @customer = Customer.find(@note.customer_id)
  end

  # POST /notes
  # POST /notes.json
  def create
    @customer = Customer.find(params[:customer_id])
    @note = @customer.notes.build(params[:note])

    respond_to do |format|
      if @note.save
        format.html { redirect_to @customer, notice: 'Note was successfully created.' }
        format.json { render json: @note, status: :created, location: @note }
      else
        format.html { render action: "new" }
        format.json { render json: @note.errors, status: :unprocessable_entity }
      end
    end
  end

  # PUT /notes/1
  # PUT /notes/1.json
  def update
    @note = Note.find(params[:id])
    @customer = Customer.find(@note.customer_id)

    respond_to do |format|
      if @note.update_attributes(params[:note])
        format.html { redirect_to @customer, notice: 'Note was successfully updated.' }
        format.json { head :no_content }
      else
        format.html { render action: "edit" }
        format.json { render json: @note.errors, status: :unprocessable_entity }
      end
    end
  end

  # DELETE /notes/1
  # DELETE /notes/1.json
  def destroy
    @note = Note.find(params[:id])
    @note.destroy

    respond_to do |format|
      format.html { redirect_to :back }
      format.json { head :no_content }
    end
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
See Eric's solution below. The solution is as simple as not defining @customer in your edit action. –  Andrew Jul 10 at 5:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If the first object in the array you pass the form builder is nil, Rails will POST to the second object only. For this reason simply don't set your @customer object in your controller's edit action. If you need access to the customer object, call it through @note.

If you're using the same partial for new and edit, you'll want to set @note.customer in the controller's new action (@customer won't be set when editing).

I think this is how the Rails team intended it to work.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer. –  Fábio Batista Apr 26 '13 at 16:08
    
Sometimes the solution is so simple it's not obvious. –  Andrew Jul 10 at 5:31

I'd like to offer a slight modification to James' solution:

# app/helpers/application_helper.rb
def shallow_args(parent, child)
  child.try(:new_record?) ? [parent, child] : child
end

Instead of relying on the controller action being called "new" -- though it likely will be 95% of the time -- this just checks if the child is a new record.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually ran into this a little bit ago and changed the check to params["#{parent.class.name.downcase}_id"].nil? == false, but this looks cleaner. –  James Mar 30 '12 at 15:08
    
Bravo, this is an excellent solution! –  Stenerson Dec 30 '13 at 19:45
    
THANK YOU! saved me a lot of headaches –  Ryan.lay Jan 21 at 12:01
    
Please see Eric's solution below. There's no need for a custom helper method. –  Andrew Jul 10 at 5:32

Here's what I came up with:

app/helpers/application_helper.rb

module ApplicationHelper

  # Public: Pick the correct arguments for form_for when shallow routes 
  # are used.
  #
  # parent - The Resource that has_* child
  # child - The Resource that belongs_to parent.
  def shallow_args(parent, child)
    params[:action] == 'new' ? [parent, child] : child
  end

end

app/views/notes/_form.html.erb

<%= simple_form_for shallow_args(@customer, @note), html: { class: 'form-vertical'} do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :content %>

  <%= f.button :submit %>
<% end -%>

I don't know that it's the best solution, but it seems to work alright.

share|improve this answer
3  
This looks like a decent solution, but I truly wish Rails had something baked in to handle this. After all, anyone using shallow routes must certainly encounter this issue as soon as they create their first form, right? –  imderek Mar 29 '12 at 21:20
    
@imderek See Eric's solution below. There's no need for a custom helper method. –  Andrew Jul 10 at 5:32

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