Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
try
{
    sqlCommandWithdraw.Connection.Open();
    sqlCommandWithdraw.Parameters["@cardNumber"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;
    readdata = sqlCommandWithdraw.ExecuteReader();

    while (readdata.Read())
    {
        balanceDB = decimal.Parse(readdata["balance"].ToString());
    }

    decimal withdrawAmm = Convert.ToDecimal(textWithdraw.Text);
    balanceDB = balanceDB - withdrawAmm;
    sqlCommandWithdraw.Connection.Close();

    sqlCommandUpdate.Connection.Open();
    sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@cardNumber"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;
    sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;
    readdata = sqlCommandUpdate.ExecuteReader();
    MessageBox.Show(balanceDB +" Successfully Withdrawn");
}

I'm working on code for an ATM machine I'm a bit stuff on the withdraw it looks fine but doesn't seem to change the balance to reflect the withdrawals in the database

My commands go like this (update)

update dbo.Accounts
set balance = @balanceDB
from dbo.ATMCards 
INNER JOIN dbo.Accounts ON dbo.ATMCards.accountID = dbo.Accounts.accountID
where (dbo.ATMCards.cardNumber = @cardNumber)

and this is my command to select the data

select dbo.Accounts.balance
from dbo.ATMCards 
INNER JOIN dbo.Accounts ON dbo.ATMCards.accountID = dbo.Accounts.accountID
where (dbo.ATMCards.cardNumber = @cardNumber)

Seems to run just fine added the message box to check it thanks for any help appreciate it!

share|improve this question
    
And your problem is? Unless I am missing it... –  Justin Pihony Mar 19 '12 at 15:11
3  
This looks suspicious to me: sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = Class1.cardNumber; –  Liath Mar 19 '12 at 15:12
    
Is that query updatable? why do you say is not working (beside the obvious at not seen it on the database..) –  gbianchi Mar 19 '12 at 15:13
    
@Liath you rules :) –  gbianchi Mar 19 '12 at 15:14
    
@Rhys Brace: +1 for using parameterized queries! –  Thorsten Dittmar Mar 19 '12 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are passing the credit card number to the parameter @balanceDB - this is the first mistake. Second, you do not use ExecuteReader to perform updates - use ExecuteNonQuery instead.

EDIT
I'll do some clean-ups for you:

try
{
    try
    {
        sqlCommandWithdraw.Connection.Open();
        sqlCommandWithdraw.Parameters["@cardNumber"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;

        // Make sure to dispose of the reader, which also closes the reader, which
        // is important, because you can't perform any other selects on a connection
        // with an open reader!
        using (SqlDataReader reader = sqlCommandWithdraw.ExecuteReader())
        {
            // You will only get one line - also, your code also only evaluates
            // one result, so we can do the following:
            if (reader.Read())
            {
                balanceDB = decimal.Parse(readdata["balance"].ToString());
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        sqlCommandWithdraw.Connection.Close();
    }

    decimal withdrawAmm = Convert.ToDecimal(textWithdraw.Text);
    balanceDB = balanceDB - withdrawAmm;

    try
    {
        sqlCommandUpdate.Connection.Open();
        sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@cardNumber"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;
        sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = balanceDB;

        sqlCommandUpdate.ExecuteNonQuery();
        MessageBox.Show(balanceDB +" Successfully Withdrawn");
    }
    finally
    {
        sqlCommandUpdate.Connection.Close();
    }

}

share|improve this answer
    
Slight rephase on this (although the upvote because I missed this one), I believe you can do an update with ExecuteReader however the difference is it will also read selected rows. In this case you are correct ExecuteNonQuery is the correct choice because there are no results returned. –  Liath Mar 19 '12 at 15:17
1  
Out of interest why Try/Finally instead of Using if you are not catching any exceptions? –  Liath Mar 19 '12 at 15:22
1  
Because the OP obviously already has instances of SQL commands that are already assigned to a connection. If in his code, the connection and command instances had also been declared, I'd have used using like I did for the temporary reader. The OP, however, opens the connection, does his thing and then closes is, but his code isn't executed upon exceptions, so I added the try/finally so that it is somewhat cleaner. –  Thorsten Dittmar Mar 19 '12 at 15:26
1  
@Liath: Actually I've never tried to use ExecuteReader for updates. Come to think of it, I can't see a reason why it shouldn't work - but I consider it good practice not to generate the overhead of creating a potentially empty result set and a reader (which must be closed) if I know in advance that there will be no result set... –  Thorsten Dittmar Mar 19 '12 at 15:30
1  
I agree entirely, the ExecuteNonQuery is the correct method to use in this case. I was attempting to clarify that in the situation where you're doing an update and a select in the same query it is possible to use ExecuteReader to do your update. –  Liath Mar 19 '12 at 15:33

This line looks suspicious to me:

sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;

Should that be Class1.balance?

share|improve this answer

You are passing a wrong value for the @balanceDB parameter. It should be balance amount. But you are passing the Card Number.

 sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = Class1.cardNumber;

should be changed to

 sqlCommandUpdate.Parameters["@balanceDB"].Value = balanceDB ;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.