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I have a method in a class where I am triggering an error.

/**
 * Get info
 * @return string|FALSE Info
 */
public function getInfo()
{
    if ($this->info) {
        return $this->info;
    }

    trigger_error('Missing info', E_USER_WARNING);
    return FALSE;
}

I do not want to throw an exception here, as I really want/need this code to continue running. Elsewhere, I log this error, and logging error is out of the scope of this class.

But how do I document this? For an exception I would use:

/**
 * @throws Exception
 */

Is there something similar for errors? I really want other developers to easily know what is going on in my code.

Thanks.

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1  
A bit offtopic: Many programmers consider even user warnings as errors. Contrary to exceptions, notices couldn't be catched [locally]. So... documenting a error seemes strange. –  kirilloid Mar 19 '12 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I agree with others that I would change my coding approach here, but addressing your direct question -- I would perhaps use the @internal tag to explain the things you're wanting developers to be aware of. Granted, when you run phpDocumentor against this code, @internal tags won't appear in your generated docs unless you use the --parse-private runtime option... this is because internal-info-for-devs is presumed to be off limits to consumers / API-interested readers, just like "@access private" items are.

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Thanks. This answers my original question best. But I have also taken the advice and am have redesigned the code, so error aren't triggered at all. –  Aine Mar 30 '12 at 13:12

There is no phpdoc tag for errors.

trigger_error() returns bool, so your method isn't returning or throwing anything. Execution will resume unless your error handler prevents that, so using @return or @throws would be misusing them, and probably confusing to anyone reading your code.


I would use a different approach.

This is how I would do it:

/**
 * Has info
 *
 * @return bool Whether info is available
 */
public function hasInfo()
{
    return (bool) $this->info; // or use isset() or whatever you need
}

/**
 * Get info
 *
 * @throws Exception
 * @return string The info string
 */
public function getInfo()
{
    if (! $this->hasInfo()) {
        throw new Exception('Missing info');
    }

    return $this->info;
}

And then from your other code, you can do:

if ($object->hasInfo()) {
    $info = $object->getInfo();
} else {
    // no info!
}

I would also catch the Exceptions at the root of my codebase:

try {
    MyApp::run();
}
catch(Exception $e) {
    // handle error, eg. display fatal error message
}
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I understand where you are coming from. Usually I would use this approach. But in this case, I'm outputting the info to something like a view. If I throw an exception, the user will see an error page. Returning FALSE for the info is better, as the user will still get usable info. But I want to know (and fix) if the info isn't set. –  Aine Mar 22 '12 at 9:18
    
That is what the hasInfo() method is for (in the second block of code). If the info isn't set, you can handle it wherever you're calling it from, a view, or a controller, or a view helper. –  dotjon Mar 22 '12 at 14:28

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