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I have tried to look up a reason as to why this loop is so slow, but I havent gotten a good answer yet. The following loop takes over a minute to execute:

        string answer = "";
        string headers = "";
        string datarows = "";
        bool firstRun = true;
        foreach (Dictionary<string, string> row in JSON)
        {
            datarows += "<tr>";
            foreach (KeyValuePair<String, String> cell in row)
            {
                if (firstRun) { headers += "<th>" + cell.Key + "</th>"; }
                datarows += "<td>" + cell.Value + "</td>";
            }
            datarows += "</tr>";
            firstRun = false;
        }
        answer += "<table><tr>" + headers + "</tr>" + datarows + "</table>";
        return answer;

The JSON variable is a List and contains about 1150 dictionaries. Each dictionary contains 9 key value pairs. Any thoughts?

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8  
Have you tried whether StringBuilder helps? – harold Mar 19 '12 at 16:48
1  
I would suggest you use StringBuilder instead of string concatenation. It won't solve all the performance issues but it can help – Jetti Mar 19 '12 at 16:48
    
Also the if (firstrun) is running on every iteration, but only used on first one.. – gbianchi Mar 19 '12 at 16:50
    
does the call to JSON invoke a network call? – Sam Axe Mar 19 '12 at 16:50
    
With 9 * 1k this is definitely the territory where += on strings is the problem. – Henk Holterman Mar 19 '12 at 16:53
up vote 12 down vote accepted

The obvious issue that springs out is your string concatenation.

Every time you append to a string, you are actually appending to a copy of the string (as the strings individually are immutable). This can be extremely costly.

You should prefer either a StringBuilder, or, for generating HTML like this, you might want to investigate the HtmlTextWriter - this will help take care of the "well-formed-ness" of the HTML amongst other things.

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1  
Thanks everyone for the quick feedback! I will remember to use the string builder from now on. – Kenny Thompson Mar 19 '12 at 17:39

Trying using a StringBuilder instead of manually concatenating the strings.

The way you are doing it, the string is re-evaluated every time you add more to the end of it and rebuilt every time, which is costly. The StringBuilder is much much more efficient for this type of work.

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Whenever you append to a string, the old one is destroyed, a new string is created.

So the string concatination gets slower and slower the more you put it.

If you swap for a StringBuilder you should get much better speed.

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Did you try changing the string type to StringBuilder where you have to concatenate ?

http://www.dotnetperls.com/stringbuilder-performance

StringBuilder answer = new StringBuilder();
StringBuilder headers = new StringBuilder();
StringBuilder datarows = new StringBuilder();
bool firstRun = true;
foreach (Dictionary<string, string> row in JSON)
{
    datarows .Apeend("<tr>");
    foreach (KeyValuePair<String, String> cell in row)
    {
        if (firstRun) { headers.Apeend("<th>" + cell.Key + "</th>"); }
        datarows.Append("<td>" + cell.Value + "</td>");
    }
     datarows.Append("</tr>");
    firstRun = false;
}
answer.Append("<table><tr>" + headers + "</tr>" + datarows + "</table>");
return answer.toString();
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