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In Java would there be any performance impact in using post increment vs pre increment operator?

Example:

i++

++i
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closed as not a real question by maerics, rsp, Woot4Moo, assylias, Graviton Mar 20 '12 at 5:33

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
As far as I know, there is no difference, performance -wise –  Chetter Hummin Mar 19 '12 at 16:52
    
Run a test and find out? –  cdeszaq Mar 19 '12 at 16:52
    
possible duplicate of Very basic Code Performance –  assylias Mar 19 '12 at 16:57
    
If you don't mind, what brings this question up? –  Jim Dagg Mar 19 '12 at 17:59
    
This is true only on anciiiiient compilers (notice the number of i's? ) –  Ram Bhat Mar 19 '12 at 20:25

3 Answers 3

A performance question only makes sense in a context where the functional behavior is identical (since, if the functionality is different, a correct behavior is superior to a minutely-faster one), so I'm assuming that you're referring to a situation where the value of the expression is not used? That is, where the only purpose of the expression is to increment i? In such a situation, the answer is no: no performance difference, and in fact, no difference whatsoever. I just compiled this class:

public class Foo
{
    public static void main(final String args[])
    {
        int i = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        i++;
    }
}

and computed the MD5 checksum of the resulting Foo.class; and, similarly for a version with ++i instead. They had the same checksum, indicating that the two versions were compiled into the exact same bytecode, and would therefore perform literally identically.

(Naturally, this could, in theory, depend on the compiler. A different compiler might decide to compile i++ differently from ++i even in a context where they're equivalent. But I doubt that, and it's really not worth worrying about even if it the case.)

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Not an answer, unless you are asserting that i = i++; and i = ++i; compile into the same code. –  EJP Mar 19 '12 at 23:44
1  
@EJP: Could you elaborate on how that's relevant? –  ruakh Mar 19 '12 at 23:47
    
It's relevant because obviously those statements don't compile to the same byte code, and it is easy to construct plenty more if that doesn't satisfy you. You've hit on an exception case where pre- or post- doesn't matter. If it really didn't matter in all cases you wouldn't have them both in the language, would you? –  EJP Mar 20 '12 at 0:01
2  
@EJP: I'm starting to suspect that you didn't even read my answer. Specifically, you don't seem to have noticed the paragraph that starts "Naturally, if you're using this in a context where the resulting value is actually used". (For that matter, you don't seem to have read the question, either: it's asking about a performance difference.) –  ruakh Mar 20 '12 at 0:05
    
I'm starting to suspect you posted a completely pointless answer. Your answer starts with the word 'no'. That is incorrect. A special case where both compile to the same bytecode proves nothing about the general case. –  EJP Mar 20 '12 at 0:34

The required runtime for the increment itself ought to be the same, but if you are using a pre- or post-increment obviously may have impact on the performance of the surrounding code and a post-increment can in more situations be optimized away.

There are also some non-obvious cases, where the performance of the surrounding code is changed. At least when run with Oracle's server VM on x86 or x64 hardware, the following loops have a significant difference in their runtime:

long a=0, b=0;
for(int i=0;i<1000000;i++) {
    b = 3;
    a += i * (b++);
}

...

long a=0, b=0;
for(int i=0;i<1000000;i++) {
    b = 3;
    a += i * (++b);
}
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I ran the following test and there doesn't seem to be any difference between the two:

@Test
public void testIncrement() {
    final long startTime1 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; ++i) {}
    final long endTime1 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(endTime1 - startTime1);

    final long startTime2 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {}
    final long endTime2 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(endTime2 - startTime2);
}
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1  
Not a valid test. The compiler and the JVM are entitled to completely eliminate both loops under the imperceptibility rule so you may not be measuring anything at all. –  EJP Mar 20 '12 at 1:36

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