Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
XX PROCEDURE [dbo].[XXX]
    @X dbo.IntType readonly
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    // how can I foreach(@X) here and do process individually?
END

IntType is a user-defined table type

CREATE TYPE [dbo].[IntType] AS TABLE(
    [T] [int] NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [T] ASC
)

I need to use this in SQL Azure, please advice.

share|improve this question
3  
Could you outline what you want to do with each row? Reason being, you should try to avoid looping round like this in SQL in favour of SET based operations so we may be able to better help –  AdaTheDev Mar 19 '12 at 17:08
    
Sure, I give a new question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9779915/… –  Eric Yin Mar 20 '12 at 0:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Cursors are the SQL equivalent of ForEach,

But cursors are often a sign of bad SQL: they violate the usual set-based thinking that SQL is built on and optimized for.

Search on SQL cursor or SQL Cursor Azure for many examples, tutorials and optimization notes.

But it can't be said enough: avoid cursors: they are often the crutch for programmers from other languages in SQL and they are often slow and hard to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
I gave this one a downvote. I do not believe he should avoid using a cursor in the case he describes (iterating over a table variable). See my cursor based answer elsewhere on this page. –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 14:46
1  
I worded my answer carefully, and said "often." The fact that the OP doesn't even know the word "cursor" indicates that they probably aren't aware of how quickly the use of cursors can kill the performance of SQL. Even in your example, while a cursor won't cause problems, it means that many potential optimizations won't be used that might get used if the table were joined into the query appropriately. OP didn't give enough details to know the best answer for his case, and I think that steering beginners away from cursors is correct. –  Jamie F Jun 27 '13 at 14:58
    
Well, again I disagree. I'm talking about the case where it HAS been established that row-by-row processing is the only possibility. This is the base for my argument. In this case (and we're still talking about table variables, not traditional tables) then steering him away from cursors will lead him to choose sub-optimal solutions like the ones based on WHILE + SELECT that you see elsewhere on this page. But, true, if he can avoid row-by-row processing in the first place then there are much better solutions (i.e. set bases solutions). –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 15:36
    
I was reacting to this: "But it can't be said enough: avoid cursors". This just seems way to general statement (even misleading) when the OP specifically talks about iterating over a table variable, not a traditional table. –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 15:40
1  
Did you see that there is a set-based answer to his particular question? Follow the link in OP's comment and you'll see that the merge statement worked well for him. We can agree to disagree. I think newcomers to SQL often feel "But I really need to use a loop here." since that is the programming model they are comfortable with. But rarely are the loops needed. The fact that it's a table variable doesn't change the fact that a cursor kills many of the potential optimizations that a SQL engine can apply. –  Jamie F Jun 27 '13 at 16:10

Why not use a cursor ???

I have to disagree with many of the other answers you'll find here on StackOverflow. Generally you'll see that people have all sorts of bad things to say about cursors .. and they are right when we talk about traditional tables .. only problem is that your question is about a table variable that you use inside a stored procedure.

Your first decision point should always be to see if you can do a set-based operation rather than an iteration (row-by-row processing). Databases are optimized for the former. The answer I give here is for those who have decided that there's no way they can use a set-based approach and the target of iteration is a table variable.

Your table variable is just like a Collection in a programming language. It is a private in-memory structure. There's absolutely no problem in iterating over that in a ForEach style when you are inside the stored procedure. If your scenario truly requires row-by-row processing then a cursor is certainly ok in your case. I really fail to see why not.

Let's go through an example based on your scenario. First we define a table type:

CREATE TYPE [IntListType] AS TABLE
   (   [T] INT  );
GO

Then we define a stored procedure that uses this table as its input:

CREATE PROCEDURE [myTest]
 (
       @IntListInput IntListType READONLY
 )
 AS
 BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @myInt INT;
    DECLARE intListCursor CURSOR LOCAL FAST_FORWARD
    FOR
    SELECT [T]
    FROM @IntListInput;

    OPEN intListCursor;

    -- Initial fetch attempt
    FETCH NEXT FROM intListCursor INTO @myInt;

    WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
       -- Here we do some kind of action that requires us to 
       -- process the table variable row-by-row. This example simply
       -- uses a PRINT statement as that action (not a very good
       -- example).
       PRINT 'Int var is : ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(max),@myInt);

       -- Attempt to fetch next row from cursor
       FETCH NEXT FROM intListCursor INTO @myInt;
    END;

    CLOSE intListCursor;
    DEALLOCATE intListCursor;
 END;
 GO

So, yes, I use a cursor for the iteration.

Note that I use the keywords LOCAL and FAST_FORWARD just to make it very clear (explicit) to the optimizer that I do not intend to update my cursor and I will scroll forward only and I will only access it from within the procedure.

I tested it like this:

DECLARE @IntList IntListType;

-- Put some random data into our list
INSERT INTO @IntList VALUES (33);
INSERT INTO @IntList VALUES (777);
INSERT INTO @IntList VALUES (845);
INSERT INTO @IntList VALUES (71);


EXEC myTest @IntList;
GO
share|improve this answer

You can do something similar to this:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[testSet]
AS

BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @NumberofIntType            int,
            @RowCount                   int

    -- get the number of items
    SET @NumberofIntType = (SELECT  count(*)
                            FROM dbo.IntType)

    SET @RowCount = 0           -- set the first row to 0

    -- loop through the records 
    -- loop until the rowcount = number of records in your table
    WHILE @RowCount <= @NumberIntType
        BEGIN
            -- do your process here

            SET @RowCount = @RowCount + 1
        END
END
share|improve this answer
2  
A WHILE loop isn't any more set based than a cursor. –  Martin Smith Mar 19 '12 at 18:06
1  
@MartinSmith you are correct, removed my comment and left the sample code. –  bluefeet Mar 19 '12 at 18:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.