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I have a page that it taking far too long to load because it has to count the number of members in each category. http://www.storeboard.com/counties/default.asp?cou=1196

Upon further investigation I stumbled upon this page: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/martijnh/archive/2010/07/15/sql-server-how-to-quickly-retrieve-accurate-row-count-for-table.aspx

The question I have is how do I change this:

SELECT COUNT(MemberID) AS MembersInCountyCat
FROM Member
WHERE NYKACountyID = @NYKACountyID
AND (
    NYKACatID = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra1 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra2 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra3 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra4 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra5 = @NYKACatID
 OR NYKACatIDExtra6 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra7 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra8 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra9 = @NYKACatID 
 OR NYKACatIDExtra10 = @NYKACatID
)
AND ProfileTypeID <> 1

Into the suggestion in solution 4 of the page I quoted.

Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks, Paul

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3  
Those examples query object/index level stats for a table, you cannot apply a condition to them - your sample page looks like it wants to count X for each category but your query sample does not seem to apply to a set of them, whats the whole sql your using –  Alex K. Mar 19 '12 at 17:15

3 Answers 3

You have to normalize yours db, i.e. move NYKACatID, NYKACatIDExtra1 .. NYKACatIDExtra10 into separate table. Define proper index for that table and rewrite yours query using join.

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1  
As Vitaliy states, your real problem is that you have denormalised your data model. Now you have to use a sequence of ORs. OR makes it difficult for the DBMS to use indexes. Tackle that problem and your performance problem will disappear too. You don't have to normalise your data model. You can tweak SQL so it can work on not normalised data models (like you showed). But it will be difficult and slow. Go With The Flow, SQL works best on normalised data models. –  Wim Mar 19 '12 at 17:54

If you really need to search all these fields then index them appropriately - use Profiler and database engine tuning advisor for a good starting point.

One alternative would be to extract those 10 NYKACatIDExtra fields to a separate table and arrange them as one-to-many relationship. Then use join to find categories for items and count should be much faster...

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Something like this maybe to take advantage of indexes (if you have any):

select MembersInCountyCat = count(*) 
from (
SELECT MemberID
FROM Member
WHERE NYKACountyID = @NYKACountyID
AND NYKACatID = @NYKACatID
AND ProfileTypeID <> 1 
union
SELECT MemberID
FROM Member
WHERE NYKACountyID = @NYKACountyID
AND NYKACatIDExtra1 = @NYKACatID 
AND ProfileTypeID <> 1
union
...
union 
SELECT MemberID
FROM Member
WHERE NYKACountyID = @NYKACountyID
AND NYKACatIDExtra10 = @NYKACatID 
AND ProfileTypeID <> 1
) t

union will make those MemberIds unique

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Unfortunately this proved to be even slower than my solution. –  neojakey Mar 19 '12 at 18:35
    
@neojakey you need separate filtered indices with included column on those columns to take advantage of this method; create nonclustered index ix_m_nykacid_nykacide1 on member (nykacountyid, nycacatidextra1) include (memberid) where profiletypeid <> 1 (10 of them) –  Denis Valeev Mar 19 '12 at 18:49

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