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Simple class

public class Group
{
    public Int16 ID { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Group ( Int16 id, string name ) 
    { ID = id; Name = name; }
}

What I would like is an ObservableCollection where the collection forces uniqueness on ID and CaseInsensitive uniqueness on Name.

What I tried is:

public class Group
{
    public Int16 ID { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(System.Object obj)
    {
        // If parameter is null return false.
        if (obj == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        // If parameter cannot be cast to Point return false.
        Group g = obj as Group;
        if ((System.Object)g == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        // Return true if either fields match:
        return ( ID == g.ID || string.Compare(Name, g.Name, true) == 0 ) ;
    }

    public bool Equals(Group g)
    {
        // If parameter is null return false:
        if ((object)g == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        // Return true if either fields match:
        return ( ID == g.ID || string.Compare(Name, g.Name, true) == 0 ) ;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return ID; // ^ (Int32)Name.ToLower();
    }

    public Group ( Int16 id, string name ) 
    { ID = id; Name = name; }
}

HashSet &lt Group &gt

That prevents adding a group with the same ID not doe not prevent adding a group with the same Name. And it does not stop renaming a Name to an existing Name.

share|improve this question
    
I am having a little trouble seeing what you want done with the collision behavior of the Group class (will editing the sub group cause a collision?). Can you post a example that uses Group in the behavior you want and show what would cause it to signal that there was a collision? @message me when you do, if you are doing what I think you are doing, I may have some code that does exactly what you want. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 19 '12 at 18:48
    
@ScottChamberlain I don't really care how it enforce uniqueness. It can throw an error or simply not perform the action. If it does not perform the action then it needs to support .contains so I can check. With GetHashCode of ID and HashSet it provides uniqueness on ID and .add simply does nothing on a repeated ID but .Contains does give the right answer (for ID alone). But this does nothing for Name which is more complex as it has a public set. –  Blam Mar 19 '12 at 19:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It will take a little tweaking of your class but here is how to do it. First you need group to notify the collection that you are about to change the name, do this by adding a event and modifying the setter of Name.

First Add this Interface and event handeler.

public delegate void TestForColisions(object sender, TestForColisionsArgs e);

public class TestForColisionsArgs : CancelEventArgs
{
    public TestForColisionsArgs(object newValue)
    {
        NewValue = newValue;
    }

    public object NewValue { get; private set; }
}


public interface ITestForColisions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Set the event to Canceled if there will be a collision.
    /// </summary>
    event TestForColisions TestForCollision;
}

Then have your class implement the interface

public class Group : ITestForColisions, IEquateable<Group>
{
    public Int16 ID { get; private set; }

    private string _Name;
    public string Name 
    {
        get { return _Name; }
        set
        {
            //If RaiseNameChanging returns true there was a collision.
            if (RaiseNameChanging(value))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("The name {0} is in use in the collection", value));
            }
            else
            {
                _Name = value;
            }
        }
    }

    protected virtual bool RaiseNameChanging(string name)
    {
        //Make a copy with the new name.
        var newGroup = (Group)this.MemberwiseClone();
        newGroup.Name = name;

        var cancelEventArgs = new TestForColisionsArgs(newGroup);
        if (TestForCollision != null)
        {
            TestForCollision(this, cancelEventArgs);
        }
        return cancelEventArgs.Cancel;
    }

   //(...)
}

Then you will need a custom collection that listens for TestForCollision events and handles accordingly. For most of the methods you can just call the parent _BaseSet's version, however for any of the methods that modify the set you will need to either subscribe or un-subscribe to the event. I have done Clear, Add and Remove for you.

public class ColisionTestedCollection<T> : ISet<T>
    where T : ITestForColisions
{
    public ColisionTestedCollection(ISet<T> baseSet)
    {
        _BaseSet = baseSet;
        _EqualityComparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    }

    public ColisionTestedCollection(ISet<T> baseSet, IEqualityComparer<T> equalityComparer)
    {
        _BaseSet = baseSet;
        _EqualityComparer = equalityComparer;
    }

    private ISet<T> _BaseSet;
    private IEqualityComparer<T> _EqualityComparer;


    void TestItemsForCollision(object sender, TestForColisionsArgs e)
    {
        if (_BaseSet.Contains((T)e.NewValue, _EqualityComparer))
        {
            e.Cancel = true;
        }
    }

    public bool Add(T item)
    {
        bool added = _BaseSet.Add(item);
        if(added)
            item.TestForCollision += TestItemsForCollision;
        return added;
    }

    void ICollection<T>.Add(T item)
    {
        ((ICollection<T>)_BaseSet).Add(item);
        item.TestForCollision += TestItemsForCollision;
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        bool removed = _BaseSet.Remove(item);
        if (removed)
            item.TestForCollision -= TestItemsForCollision;
        return removed;
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        foreach (var item in _BaseSet)
            item.TestForCollision -= TestItemsForCollision;
        _BaseSet.Clear();
    }

    public void ExceptWith(IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void IntersectWith(IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void SymmetricExceptWith(IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void UnionWith(IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    //The rest of the functions will just be simply calling _BaseSet's version of the method. 
    public bool IsProperSubsetOf(IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        return _BaseSet.IsProperSubsetOf(other);
    }
    //(snip)
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have not tested it out fully but it looks correct. Thanks. –  Blam Mar 20 '12 at 15:45

I think that an ObservableCollection (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms668604.aspx) and a KeyedCollection (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132440.aspx) would be a good place to start.

You could create a custom type that inherits from KeyedCollection and implements INotifyCollectionChanged interface.

Using the KeyedCollection you could "key" on the ID column, and it would enforce the uniqueness of that. However, if you want a more complex check, you might just implement an IList, INotifyCollectionChanged, and throw some custom exceptions if the criteria are not met when adding new items.

share|improve this answer
    
INotifyCollectionChanged Notifies listeners of dynamic changes, such as when items get added and removed or the whole list is refreshed. I need more than add uniqueness checks. If an item is changed I want to stop the change if it is not unique by the criteria of the question. I could pass the collection to the item but I was hoping there was something less coupled. –  Blam Mar 19 '12 at 18:13

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