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I am pretty new to EF and DBContext, and so am looking for some advise as to the best way to set out my code for a WCF service using EF, Stored Procs, or SQL.

The Background

I have an MVC3 front end that is hooked up to a WCF service layer for the Data access (Oracle). The actual Data access is via a separate DAO class library.

My goal is to have the service layer consume an interface only, on which it can call a set of methods to return the data. I do not want the service layer aware that we are using EF for the queries, as I may replace the slow EF bits with Stored Procs or plain SQL text as an when required.

Where I'm upto at the moment

I have an Interface for my database IDB, and a concreate implementation of IDB, MyDB, that also implements DBContext. MyDb then has a couple of derived classes called MyStdDB and MySecureDB. When I want the interface, I call my factory method which works out if I need a standard or secure db, and then returns that into my interface variable.

WCF Code:

public List<string> GetAccount() {
   IDB _db = DBFactory.GetInstance();
   return _db.GetAccount();
}

DBFactory code:

 pubilc class DBFactory {
   pubilc static IDB GetInstance()
   {
     if bSecure
        return MySecureDB;
     else 
        return MyStdDB;
   }
 }

So when I want to ask for a query I want to ask _db.GetAccount() within my Service call. At the moment I have added this as an extension method on the IDB interface. The reason for that was to prevent the service seeing my EF entities, and it allows spearation of the qqueries into logical files, eg. Class full of CUSTOMER queries, class full of ACCOUNT queries.

IDB Code:

public interface IDB : IDisposable
{
    ObjectContext UnderlyingContext { get; }
    int SaveChanges();
}

MyDB Code:

public class MyDB : DbContext, IDB 
{
    ObjectContext IDB.UnderlyingContext
    {
        get
        {
            return ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext;
        }
    }

    int IDB.SaveChanges()
    {
        return SaveChanges();
    }       

    public DbSet<Customer> Customer { get; set; }
}

Extension Method:

public static List<string> GetAccount(this IDB _db)
{
    ((MyDB)_db).Customer.AsNoTracking().First();
}

The Issue

As you may see, I have to cast the interface into the concrete object so that I can get to the EF entities. This is because the entities are on the implementation of the class rather than the interface. The Extension method is in my DAO class library, so that would change when my IDB implmentation changed, but I still dont like it. Is there a better way to do this? Am I looking at DI?

The big drivers for me are:

  • Access to the database must be via an interface only, as we may be replacing the db soon.
  • The data access methods must be hidden from the service. I should only be able to access data via the methods provided by the interface/extension methods etc.
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The workaround is moving your GetAccount to IDB instead of using extension methods:

public interface IDB : IDisposable
{
    ObjectContext UnderlyingContext { get; }
    List<string> GetAccount();
    int SaveChanges();
}

It solves your issue because MyDB will implement the method and all derived classes will use implementation as well. If they provide other implementation they will simply override it.

The data access methods must be hidden from the service. I should only be able to access data via the methods provided by the interface/extension methods etc.

But they are not. The method / property is hidden if it is not public but currently any your service can convert IDB to MyDB and access DbSet directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... this is what I had initally. Although there is nothing wrong with the solution, my beef is that I will have 500+ query methods in a single class implementation. Via the extension method solution, I can separate the query methods into logical groups for ease of reference. – Nick Mar 19 '12 at 23:05

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