Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let T(x,y) be the number of tours over a X × Y grid such that:

  1. the tour starts in the top left square
  2. the tour consists of moves that are up, down, left, or right one square
  3. the tour visits each square exactly once, and
  4. the tour ends in the bottom left square.

It’s easy to see, for example, that T(2,2) = 1, T(3,3) = 2, T(4,3) = 0, and T(3,4) = 4. Write a program to calculate T(10,4).

I have been working on this for hours ... I need a program that takes the dimensions of the grid as input and returns the number of possible tours?

I have been working on this for hours ... I need a program that takes the dimensions of the grid as input and returns the number of possible tours?

I wrote this code to solve the problem ... I cant seem to figure out how to check all directions.

#include <iostream>

int grid[3][3];
int c = 0;

int main(){    
    solve (0, 0, 9);
}

int solve (int posx, int posy, steps_left){
    if (grid[posx][posy] = 1){
        return 0;
    }
    if (steps_left = 1 && posx = 0 && posy = 2){
        c = c+1;
        return 0;
    }
    grid[posx][posy] = 1;
    // for all possible directions
    {
        solve (posx_next, posy_next, steps_left-1)
    }
    grid[posx][posy] = 0;
}

Algorithm by @KarolyHorvath You need some data structure to represent the state of the cells on the grid (visited/not visited).

Your algorithm:

step(posx, posy, steps_left)
    if it is not a valid position, or already visited
        return
    if it's the last step and you are at the target cell
        you've found a solution, increment counter
        return
    mark cell as visited             
    for each possible direction:
       step(posx_next, posy_next, steps_left-1)
    mark cell as not visited

and run with step(0, 0, sizex*sizey)

share|improve this question
5  
You should probably tag this as homework. –  Tiago Pasqualini Mar 19 '12 at 18:14
    
Algorithm by @KarolyHorvath You need some data structure to represent the state of the cells on the grid (visited/not visited). Your algorithm: step(posx, posy, steps_left) if it is not a valid position, or already visited return if it's the last step and you are at the target cell you've found a solution, increment counter return mark cell as visited for each possible direction: step(posx_next, posy_next, steps_left-1) mark cell as not visited and run with step(0, 0, sizex*sizey) –  user1277552 Mar 19 '12 at 18:16
    
Is this homework? –  Carey Gregory Mar 19 '12 at 18:18
    
Take a look at this and try to change it to fit your needs: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Tiago Pasqualini Mar 19 '12 at 18:19
    
@dmckee Yyyep, just deleted that comment. Sorry! –  aardvarkk Mar 19 '12 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

It's not difficult, since you've been given the algorithm. In order to solve the problem, you'll probably want some sort of dynamic data structure (unless you're only interested in the exact case of T(10,4)). For the rest, left is -1 on the x index, right +1, and down is -1 on the y dimension, up +1. Add bounds checking and verification that you've not visited, and the job is done.

But I wonder how much time such an obvious algorithm will take. There's a four way decision on each cell; for the fourty cells of T(10,4), that's 4^40 decisions. Which is not feasable. Things like eliminating already visited cells and bounds checking eliminate a lot of branches, but still... The goal of the competition might be to make you find a better algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
Right now I am not worrying about eliminating other cases .... but that is def something I ll do once I have a basic version. Can you tell me how I should code the check eacch direction part .... I tried using two for loops to check all four directions but apparently that is not the way to go? Any other limitations you see in my code? Thanks! –  user1277552 Mar 19 '12 at 19:01
    
3 way decision (you cannot go back where you came from). 2 on the edges. I also mentioned the problem in my original answer stackoverflow.com/a/9763698/650405 with some hint. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 19 '12 at 23:11
    
I wouldn't bother with a loop. There are four cases; I'd just code each of the four manually (calling a function to check the legality, so as not to duplicate that code). –  James Kanze Mar 20 '12 at 8:11
    
@KarolyHorvath I'm not sure about a three way decision; once you're on a given square, you don't really know where you've come from. There are four possible moves, with the restrictions that you can't leave the board (bounds check) and you can't enter an already visited square---where you came from, or anywhere you've been before. I think that handling where you came from specially would only complicate the code. –  James Kanze Mar 20 '12 at 8:14
    
it would compilcate it, but it's unneeded.. if you check my pseudocode that branch terminates right after evaluating it. so that's still an O(1) operation, leaving only 3 "real" ways. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 20 '12 at 8:54

You really should pick a debugger and see what's going on on a small board (2x2, 3x3).

One obvious problem is that = is assignment, not comparison. Compare with ==.

There are more problems. Find them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.