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This is probably a long shot but I asked a question about converting one of the statistics toolbox codes earlyier into C# realising that it was just a huge and lengthy process and there was not much in the way to automate it (really what I wanted as the references I provided explained why it was so hard to do by hand, as the comments I got where: why dont you try convert it and ask questions on where you are stuck, which obviously my question wasnt understood!).

The reason I was looking to do this is because of the long processing time required by matlab to complete what im working on (k-means and bayes classifiers on large data sets). So I thought well hey why not just convert the code into C# and try my hand at multithreading and Multiprocessing, this might provide a functional means to decrease the processing time. But obviously its extremely hard to convert all of matlabs functions to C# by hand to accommandate this.

So my question is if I import matlabs files into C# is it possible to have them used/ran in multithreading and multiprocessing fashion or will the imported files just run like they do in matlab?

The reason (I think) it runs slow in matlab is that the functions or some of them in the statistics toolbox only benefit from multithreading specifically:

MATHEMATICS
Arrays and matrices
• Basic information: ISFINITE, ISINF, ISNAN, MAX, MIN
• Operators: +, -, .*, ./, .\, .^, *, ^, \ (MLDIVIDE), / (MRDIVIDE)
• Array operations: PROD, SUM
• Array manipulation: BSXFUN, SORT


Linear algebra
• Matrix Analysis: DET, RCOND
• Linear Equations: CHOL, INV, LINSOLVE, LU, QR
• Eigenvalues and singular values: EIG, HESS, SCHUR, SVD, QZ

Elementary math
• Trigonometric: ACOS, ACOSD, ACOSH, ASIN, ASIND, ASINH, ATAN, ATAND, ATANH, COS, COSD, COSH,HYPOT, SIN, SIND, SINH, TAN, TAND, TANH
• Exponential: EXP, POW2, SQRT
• Complex: ABS
• Rounding and remainder: CEIL, FIX, FLOOR, MOD, REM, ROUND

Special Functions
• ERF, ERFC, ERFCINV, ERFCX, ERFINV, GAMMA, GAMMALN

DATA ANALYSIS
• CONV2, FILTER, FFT and IFFT of multiple columns or long vectors, FFTN, IFFTN  

So im not to sure how or in what way I could potentially decrease the processing time, the kmeans and bayes classifier when processeing near tens of thousands of records really is just unbearable on its processing time (understandable).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not something you will be able to do easily. In fact I would say it is not possible.

If you attempt it you have the following issues to deal with:

  • Find a (semi) automated way to convert math lab functionality into C#
    This does not exist to my knowledge.
  • Alter the resulting code to be multithreading enabled
    To make modify a mathematical algorithm to supported multiple threads is very difficult and sometimes even impossible due to the data structures used
  • Also keep in mind that some mathematical problems do not scale with the number of processors, so you might not even get the benefit you expected.
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Damm, really not what I was hoping for. I found this blog Speeding up Kmeans so I might figure out what he has done here then. –  Garrith Graham Mar 19 '12 at 18:28
    
Thanks though for the post. –  Garrith Graham Mar 19 '12 at 18:28
    
@Garrith The post describes how to optimize (mathematically) the existing algorithms, if you have the mathematical background this is definitively the way to go since there you can usually get execution reduction far better that x2 or x4. You also you know your data well and with that info you can usually optimize an algorithm much better, but this has nothing todo with parallelization as such –  ntziolis Mar 19 '12 at 18:38
    
No ofcourse not I understand this, I just found it when I was searching for such an optimization technique. Thought it might help anyone else who comes across my post with a similar query. But no my maths background isnt solid so it might not work. Ofcourse aswell this only covers one of the algorithms. –  Garrith Graham Mar 19 '12 at 18:52

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