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Whats the difference between using a LEFT OUTER JOIN, rather than a sub-query that starts with a WHERE NOT EXISTS (...)?

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There are so many differences with those concepts, but for start a subquery will execute one per row of the primary table, a LEFT JOIN won't.... –  Lamak Mar 19 '12 at 18:26
1  
@Lamak - In SQL Server where not exists is implemented as an anti semi join and may use either hash, merge, or nested loops. Exactly same physical join operator choices as LOJ but potentially more efficient as avoids dupes being brought in. –  Martin Smith Mar 19 '12 at 18:29
    
@MartinSmith - I understood the question as an subquery on the SELECT, something like SELECT a, (SELECT b FROM table WHERE NOT EXISTS ...), but on a second look, it seems that I understood it the wrong way –  Lamak Mar 19 '12 at 18:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

No they are not the same thing, as they will not return the same rowset in the most simplistic use case.

The LEFT OUTER JOIN will return all rows from the left table, both where rows exist in the related table and where they does not. The WHERE NOT EXISTS() subquery will only return rows where the relationship is not met.

However, if you did a LEFT OUTER JOIN and looked for IS NULL on the foreign key column in the WHERE clause, you can make equivalent behavior to the WHERE NOT EXISTS.

For example this:

SELECT 
  t_main.*,
FROM 
   t_main
   LEFT OUTER JOIN t_related ON t_main.id = t_related.id
/* IS NULL in the WHERE clause */
WHERE t_related.id IS NULL

Is equivalent to this:

SELECT
  t_main.*
FROM t_main 
WHERE 
  NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT t_related.id 
    FROM t_related 
    WHERE t_main.id = t_related.id
  )

But this one is not equivalent:

It will return rows from tmain both having and not having related rows in trelated.

SELECT 
  t_main.*,
FROM
  t_main
  LEFT OUTER JOIN t_related ON t_main.id = t_related.id
/* WHERE clause does not exclude NULL foreign keys */

Note This does not speak to how the queries are compiled and executed, which differs as well -- this only addresses a comparison of the rowsets they return.

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2  
Just a clarification: the LEFT OUTER JOIN will return all rows from the left table; it is possible that there are rows in the right table which will not be returned. –  user937146 Mar 19 '12 at 18:28
    
excellent explanation !\ –  Kumar Vaibhav Apr 7 at 7:14

As Michael already answered your question here is a quick sample to illustrate the difference:

Table A
Key     Data
1       somedata1
2       somedata2

Table B
Key     Data
1       data1

Left outer join:

SELECT *
FROM A
LEFT OUTER JOIN B
ON A.Key = B.Key

Result:

Key     Data        Key     Data
1       somedata1   1
2       somedata2   null    null

Not Exists In:

SELECT *
FROM A
WHERE NOT EXISTS IN (SELECT B.Key FROM B WHERE A.Key = B.Key)

Result:

Key     Data        
2       somedata2
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2  
Of course you should generally not use select * in production code. –  HLGEM Mar 19 '12 at 18:53
2  
@HLGEM That's for sure, used the * since it points out the second difference (less columns returned) really well –  ntziolis Mar 19 '12 at 20:13

Left outer join is more flexible than where not exists. You must use a left outer join if you want to return any of the columns from the child table. You can also use the left outer join to return records that match the parent table as well as all records in the parent table that have no match. Where not exists only lets you return the records with no match.

However in the case where they do return the equivalent rows and you do not need any of the columns in the right table, then where exists is likely to be the more performant choice (at least in SQL server, I don't know about other dbs).

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"You must use [an] outer join if you want to return any of the columns from the child table" -- (ignoring the fact that LEFT OUTER JOIN can always be substituted with RIGHT OUTER JOIN), I really must pick you up on your use of the word "must" :) Outer join is a kind of union, performed by padding one/both tables with nulls in order to satisfy the usual requirement for union. Therefore, the same effect can be performed in SQL using UNION with another join type (inner, natural, etc). –  onedaywhen Mar 20 '12 at 9:50

I suspect the answer ultimately is, both are used (among other constructs) to perform the relational operation antijoin in SQL.

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