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So I have these two tables in my database:

Companies
--------------------
CompanyID (PK)
Name


Employees
--------------------
EmployeeID (PK)
CompanyID (FK)
Name

Basically, one company has many employees.

But I'd like to have each company have exactly one employee who is the Main Contact. My initial thought was to just add a MainContactID field to the Companies table that references the EmployeeID in Employees, but that would create a loop with the relationships.

What's the best way to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is nothing (in my opinion) wrong with your initial thought.

Although there is a loop as you put it, there isn't a problem here.

Having companies.MainContactEmployeeID ensures that there is only one such contact per company.

Then, adding a foreign key of Companies(CompanyID,MainContactEmployeeID) : Employees(CompanyID,EmployeeID) ensures that the employee actually works for that company. (Requires a matching unique index on the Employee table as well).

Such a foreign key is only possible because of the 'loop'. It's certainly not a problem.

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This would create a situation of a circular refernce, employees is already a child of Company, it can't also be parent or you would not be able to insert records. –  HLGEM Mar 19 '12 at 19:06
2  
@HLGEM - I disagree, this is a pattern I've used, and it does work. 1. Create the company with no MainContact (NULL FK). 2. Create child employees to that company. 3. Update the company's main contact to one of the employees you have created. –  MatBailie Mar 19 '12 at 19:53

We do something simliar with addresses and emails and phones. We have a field that marks the record as the main one. This field is then maintained through a trigger so that if the main contact point changes, you still have only one and if the main contact is deleted, the trigger uses the business rules to figure out which remaining record would get the flag, since we must have at least one main record if we have any records at all.

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i personally prefer this model:

Organization
-------------
organization_id
name
other_columns

Person
-------------
person_id
name
other_columns

Person_Organization
--------------------
person_id
organization_id
begin_date
end_date
relationship_cd

this allows people to work for more than one organization at a time (certainly possible) and allows you to be very flexible on the relationship definitions - so 'how' was this person related to this org at this time... (important for contractors etc.)

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How would you enforce "Max of 1 employee to be main contact"? –  MatBailie Mar 19 '12 at 18:54
1  
There could be several ways -- you could adopt either a constraint or an insert/update trigger to the Person_Organization to enforce "Max 1 Employee". I think it's much extendable to enforce this in this fashion, rather than bake it directly into the table structure. –  Mike Ryan Mar 19 '12 at 19:07

If you don't want to have

  • circular paths in the FK relationships
  • Nulls in the FK columns

you can use this:

Add a UNIQUE constraint in Employee(CompanyID, EmployeeID) and make another table:

Company_MainContact
--------------------
CompanyID  (PK) (FK1-->Employee)
EmployeeID      (FK1-->Employee)
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Creating a table with a combined primary key, like this:

Company_MainContact
--------------------
EmployeeID (PK) (FK-->Employee)
CompanyID (PK)  (FK-->Company)
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Although this does work and has it's own merits, I think the OP is kind of interested in why as much as the proposed options. Do you have reasons why you would do it this way when it's always 1:1? –  MatBailie Mar 19 '12 at 18:55
    
Working from an assumption that the database was already populated, and "working" and this main contact identifier was a new requirement, this is likely the quickest and easiest solution without requiring 1) refactoring of the data model, or 2) ugly hacks relating to triggers, etc. –  Chad Mar 19 '12 at 19:16
    
This solution is not 100% correct. A company's main contact can be a person working for another company, this way. –  ypercube Mar 20 '12 at 8:17
    
Plus, a company can have more than 1 main contacts this way. –  ypercube Mar 20 '12 at 8:18
    
@ypercube both good points :) Would need some type of input validation or trigger to keep consistency. –  Chad Mar 20 '12 at 14:24

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