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I'm writing a plug-in module for a system that uses CakePHP 1.2 and I am new to the framework. How does one do the following query the Cake way?

SELECT a.id, a.name, COUNT(a.id) AS comments
FROM articles a LEFT JOIN comments c ON a.id = c.item_id
GROUP BY a.id
ORDER BY comments DESC;

I can't edit the Article or Comment models, but I'm trying this in my plug-in's model and it doesn't give the same result:

$this->loadModel('Article');
$options['fields'] = array('Article.id', 'Article.name', 
              'COUNT(Article.id) AS comments');
$options['joins'] = array(
    array('table' => 'comments',
          'alias' => 'c',
          'type' => 'INNER',
          'conditions' => array(
          'Article.id = c.item_id')
         ));
$options['group'] = array('Article.id');
$options['order'] = 'comments DESC';
$options['limit'] = 5;
$rows = $this->Article->find('all', $options);

Also, I'm not sure but I think the Article class might already have:

 public $actsAs = array('Containable');
 public $hasMany = array('Comment');
share|improve this question
    
In your plain sql you have a LEFT JOIN, in the Cake you define type => INNER. Is it intentional? –  biziclop Mar 19 '12 at 19:26
    
I believe INNER is more correct and you use LEFT and RIGHT only with OUTER joins, but in my experience MySQL treats JOIN, LEFT JOIN and INNER JOIN all identical –  JannieT Mar 20 '12 at 17:42
    
No, INNER and LEFT (LEFT OUTER) joins are treated differently. However mysql will trat a LEFT JOIN as an INNER JOIN if you add further conditions on the joined table to the WHERE clause. –  bfavaretto Mar 20 '12 at 18:17
    

2 Answers 2

I think you also need to add foreignKey => FALSE to your join definition:

$options['joins'] = array(
    array('table' => 'comments',
          'alias' => 'c',
          'type' => 'INNER',
          'foreignKey' => FALSE,
          'conditions' => array('Article.id = c.item_id')
     )
);

Also, if you are forcing the joins yourself, you should get rid of any previous Cake-style associations, either by passing recursive => FALSE as an options, or by applying unbindModel to each associated model.

UPDATE

Based on what you said in the comments, here is what I think you need:

$options['fields'] = array(
    'Article.id', 
    'Article.name', 
    'COUNT(DISTINCT c.id) AS comments'
);
$options['joins'] = array(
    array(
        'table' => 'comments',
        'alias' => 'c',
        'type' => 'LEFT OUTER',
        'foreignKey' => FALSE,
        'conditions' => array('Article.id = c.item_id')
    )
);
$options['group'] = array('Article.id');
$options['order'] = 'COUNT(DISTINCT c.id) DESC';
$rows = $this->Article->find('all', $options);
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to report that I have tried all three suggestions with no luck. Only one row is returned and it has the wrong comment count. –  JannieT Mar 20 '12 at 18:03
    
@JannieT, please see my updated answer. –  bfavaretto Mar 20 '12 at 18:13
    
Sorry, no dice. –  JannieT Mar 21 '12 at 6:32
    
+1 for the LEFT OUTER join. It didn't solve my problem, but it is a better query for my use case –  JannieT Mar 21 '12 at 12:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Very unexpected answer:

The version of CakePHP used by this project (which I can do nothing about) is version 1.2.0.6311 beta released on 2008-01-02 and according to this article the group by functionality in Cake's model find method was only added in May 2008

share|improve this answer
    
Ha! I'd never figure that one out! So you'll have to update Cake, or forget about the "cake way" and simply run your query with Model::query. –  bfavaretto Mar 21 '12 at 15:08
    
Yes, I sanitize my parameters and use $this->query(...) –  JannieT Mar 21 '12 at 19:32

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