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with this code I select the first 30 row of the table:

SELECT * FROM `table` LIMIT 0 , 30

But how to select the last 30, without changing the order?

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2  
Here you don't have any order. –  Sergio Tulentsev Mar 19 '12 at 19:50
2  
Does your table have a field (or fields) that could be used to put the data in order? Perhaps a TIMESTAMP column or an auto-incrementing INT column? –  Brian Driscoll Mar 19 '12 at 19:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It looks like everyone is missing this part:

But how to select the last 30, without changing the order?

First of all, clearly there is no order in the query provided. Assuming the order is ascending on some field this would be the query @DannyFox meant:

SELECT * FROM T
ORDER BY val
LIMIT 0 , 30

Now imagine we have simplified data, such as a, b, c, d, e and that we want only 3 rows instead of 30:

SELECT * FROM T
ORDER BY val
LIMIT 3

If this returns: a, b, c, d, e in each row, then he would expect to get c, d, e in that order. The query everyone is providing:

SELECT * FROM T
ORDER BY val desc
LIMIT 3

Would return e, d, c. The problem with this is that it's actually changing the original order, and the OP say he didn't want to change the order. So technically, the query that would result in c, d, e is:

select * from (
  select * from t
  order by val desc
  limit 3
) s
order by val

Which actually changes the order twice, getting the original order back.

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Looks like I beat you to it, but +1 for thinking like me. :) –  Shef Mar 19 '12 at 20:15
    
Lol, +1 for you too :) –  Mosty Mostacho Mar 19 '12 at 20:17

Since you are trying to avoid ordering, then the solution would be to apply it twice.

 SELECT * 
   FROM (
            SELECT * 
              FROM `table_name` 
          ORDER BY `column_name` DESC -- maybe id?
             LIMIT 0, 30
         ) `table_aliase`
ORDER BY `column_name` ASC
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First you need to specify an order:

SELECT * FROM table
ORDER BY some_id ASC -- ascending order
LIMIT 30

If that query returns the first 30 columns, this one will return the last 30:

SELECT * FROM table
ORDER BY some_id DESC -- descending order
LIMIT 30
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If you have an auto incremental key/column, say id then here's an example

SELECT * FROM `table` ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 0 , 30;
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Maybe this will work: select * from table WHERE id > ((SELECT MAX(id) from table) - 30);

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1  
If some of the last 30 records were deleted and the id is auto-incremental you would get less than 30 results. –  OhCaN Mar 19 '12 at 19:53
4  
Yeah, that's a big maybe, especially if there are gaps between ids. ORDER BY clause is the pro solution, nothing less nothing more. –  Shef Mar 19 '12 at 19:53
2  
This answer assumes a lot about the composition of the table. –  Brian Driscoll Mar 19 '12 at 19:54
1  
This is not the best solution. As mentioned by Shef and other ORDER BY is the way to go. But there was this limitation from question "... without changing the order". –  tonymarschall Mar 19 '12 at 19:58

Nothing is said about an order, so you can not use ORDER BY. There is a way to get records from a given point, but for that you need to know how many records there are, then use this counted value to provide the limits

SELECT COUNT(*) AS counted FROM table

SELECT * FROM table LIMIT (counted-30),30
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Here's my method used with PHP:

$query = "SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 3";
$res = mysql_query($query);
$results = array();
while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($res)){
     $results = $row[field];
}
// Back to original order based from DB
$results = array_reverse(results);
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