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I'm looking for the best method of handling errors in a c# winforms class that I have. The gist of the application is that it has a data analyzer that analyzes the data for statistics and other such stuff. However, I'm looking for the proper way of handling an ABORT.

For example, I have the class called Analyzer

namespace PHOEBE
{
    public class Analyzer
    {
        public Analyzer(){
            DoAnalysis();
            DoFurtherAnalysis();
        }

    public class DoAnalysis(){
        try{
            Convert.ToInt32("someNumber...."); //obviously fails..
        }
        catch{
          //ERROR OCCURRED, ABORT ALL ANALYSIS
            return;
        }
    }
}

Obviously, when DoAnalysis() is called, there will be an error that occurs. The catch block will catch the exception. However, when this catch occurs, it will return to the constructor and run DoFurtherAnalysis(). This is a problem.

I know that you could do return values from each method where each value indicates a certain outcome (ie. 1 = success, 0 = fail). However, a lot of the methods I call, use return values already. I could also use a boolean that gets flagged when an error occurs and check that value before calling the next method from the constructor, but checking this value each time is annoying and repetitive.

I was really hoping for some sort of like "abort mechanism" that I could use. Is there any other ways of working around this? Any interesting work-arounds for this?

Assume this class is being called from a form.

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4  
The exception is your abort mechanism. Don't catch it if you're not going to handle it. –  Steve Czetty Mar 19 '12 at 19:54
    
In my experience, I have found having the exception as close to the error as possible makes locating the cause of it much easier. However, taking into account your concept of don't catch what you can't handle concept -- I clearly need to revamp my error handling ways. –  ImGreg Mar 19 '12 at 20:03
    
@ImGreg my experience is the complete oposite. Let as many methods be transparent to exceptions and catch them closer to the UI yeilds simpler and less error prone code. Remember that the exception has a stacktrace to help you locate the source of the error quickly. –  vidstige Mar 19 '12 at 20:06

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Just let the exception propagate up - you should only catch the exception if you can actually handle it. Exceptions are the "abort mechanism" in .NET. You're currently swallowing the signal that everything's gone wrong, and returning as if all were well.

Generally I find catching exceptions to be pretty rare - usually it's either at the top level (to stop a whole server from going down just because of one request) or in order to transform an exception of one kind into another in order to maintain appropriate abstractions.

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Why do you specify exception as "abort mechanism" related to .NET concretly? Is this just case, or you met different phylosophy in other languages? –  Tigran Mar 19 '12 at 19:59
    
@Tigran - The question is a .NET one. It is a reasonable enough reason to specify .NET. –  Oded Mar 19 '12 at 20:00
    
@Tigran Used the term for a lack of a better one xD. –  ImGreg Mar 19 '12 at 20:00
2  
@Tigran: Only because the OP is using .NET. I'm saying "Exceptions are the way that .NET indicates an error; you're using .NET therefore exceptions are the way you should expect errors to be propagated." I wasn't trying to imply that this is exclusively a .NET mechanism. –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '12 at 20:01
    
Was just a curiosity, thought there is something behind that words. Thanks. –  Tigran Mar 19 '12 at 20:04

I was really hoping for some sort of like "abort mechanism" that I could use. Is there any other ways of working around this? Any interesting work-arounds for this?

Yes, there is. It is called exception handling.

Let's rewrite your code:

namespace PHOEBE
{
    public class Analyzer
    {
        public Analyzer()
        {
            try
            {
                DoAnalysis();
                DoFurtherAnalysis();
            }
            catch
            {
                //ERROR OCCURRED, ABORT ALL ANALYSIS
                return;
            }
        }

    public class DoAnalysis()
    {
        Convert.ToInt32("someNumber...."); //obviously fails..
    }
}

Now, the constructor will abort and not run the second method since the exception will "bubble through" and be catched where you want it.

On an unrelated note: Please try to catch as specific exceptions as possible, in this case a FormatException

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1  
I'd even take it a step further, since this would return an instance of Analyzer which was constructed in error. Better to let the exception bubble up even further and let it be handled by whatever is trying to create the Analyzer instance. (Unless there's more to an Analyzer than what's presented here and it can internally logically handle the constructor exception.) (Come to think of it... would this even compile with just the bare return statement in a constructor? Definitely better to be more explicit there.) –  David Mar 19 '12 at 19:56
1  
So true. This was just a quick exercise to show my point. And the return statement compiles just fine although completely redundant in this case. I worked with small change so we can clearly see the important point here. –  vidstige Mar 19 '12 at 20:03

You are subverting the existing "abort" mechanism by catching an exception that you are not doing anything about and swallowing it.

You should not use a try{}catch{} block in this case and let the exception bubble up and cause the application to abort.

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Wouldn't that make trying to determine the cause of the exception much more difficult? If there is only one try/catch block then how would you distinguish between the numerous different errors that could occur? –  ImGreg Mar 19 '12 at 19:55
    
There are different types of exceptions and different state for the different exceptions that handle that. –  Steven Oxley Mar 19 '12 at 19:57
1  
@ImGreg - A mechanism to identify these exists. It is called a stack trace and is part of the exception information. –  Oded Mar 19 '12 at 19:57
    
@ImGreg: The stack trace, the type of exception, logging useful information about the state of the application, etc. –  David Mar 19 '12 at 19:58

The easiest work-around is don't catch the exception. If that were to happen, it'd go straight past the DoFurtherAnalysis() function and out to the original caller.

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Don't see anything anoying in returning and checking bool return value from the function. It's much much better solution then having some tricky internal state management, that you for sure will messed up after a couple of months when you return to your code.

Make code sumple and streghtforward. It's not anoying, it's good.

In your specific case if you want just abort everything, just do not catch exception it will abort your program.

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If you are calling around 15 methods from the constructor, I would see putting an if statement before each method call somewhat annoying.. –  ImGreg Mar 19 '12 at 19:57
    
@ImGreg: Correct, "return codes" are not really the .NET way of doing things. They're useful sometimes but not as a blanket approach to error handling. –  David Mar 19 '12 at 19:59
    
I'm answering the question posted here. It doesn't seem he call 15 methods in execution dependant chain. There is no dogma solution, for sure. But returning failure/sucess value from the method often is very good design. –  Tigran Mar 19 '12 at 20:02

use a try...catch in the constructor?

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Well, you've got several issues mixed up here. First, it looks like you do possibly-very expensive processing from your constructor. If that processing can throw, you really don't want to call it from your constructor becuase you don't even have the option of returning an error code.

Second, (and you'll read in many threads here,) how you handlee errors really depends on the application and expectation of your users. Some errors could be corrected by changes to inputs. Others might happen in the middle of the night if analysis takes a long time and you might want to continue with another analysis, logging this error.

So I think we're really going to punt back to you for more information about the above.

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You could just move DoFurtherAnalysis(); into the the try block

And I would do this entire process somewhere other than the constructor. Only thing I ever do in the constructor is initialize properties.

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