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I have a function that decrements a whole number parameter represented by a string. For instance, if I pass in the string "100", it should return "99."

def dec(s):
    i = len(s) - 1
    myString = ""
    while (i >= 0):
        if s[i] == '0':
            s[i] = '9'
            i -= 1
        else:
            s[i] = chr(int(s[i]) - 1)
            break
    return s

However, Python issues this error.

s[i] = '9'
TypeError: 'str' object does not support item assignment 

I am assuming that s[i] cannot be treated as an lvalue. What is a solution around this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't. In Python, strings are immutable -- once created, they can't be changed.

You have two options without changing your function entirely.

Convert the string to a list and back:

def dec(s):
    s = list(s)
    i = len(s) - 1
    myString = ""
    while (i >= 0):
        if s[i] == '0':
            s[i] = '9'
            i -= 1
        else:
            s[i] = chr(int(s[i]) - 1)
            break
    return ''.join(s)

Create a new string each time you want to make a change:

def dec(s):
    i = len(s) - 1
    myString = ""
    while (i >= 0):
        if s[i] == '0':
            s = s[:i] + "9" + s[i+1:]
            i -= 1
        else:
            s = s[:i] + chr(int(s[i]) - 1) + s[i+1:]
            break
    return s
share|improve this answer
    
The performance of both of these approaches would be terrible. –  Marcin Mar 20 '12 at 8:12
    
@Marcin often performance doesn't matter. Good to point out though. –  Mark Ransom Mar 20 '12 at 13:24
    
@MarkRansom The performance would be terrible AND the code is complex. –  Marcin Mar 20 '12 at 13:25
    
@Marcin I was trying to show him why his code didn't work, not give him the correct code. Despite this not being tagged homework, That's what it looks like to me. I don't do people's homework. –  agf Mar 20 '12 at 19:19

You can do:

s = s[:i] + "9" + s[i+1:]

This takes the part of the string before character index i, appends a 9, then appends the part of the string after character index i. However, doing a lot of string appends like this is not terribly efficient.

The other answer is that if you're dealing with numbers, why not actually use numbers instead of strings?

def dec(s):
    return str(int(s) - 1)
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1  
casting string to int and then back to string is the easiest solution imo. –  Markus Wotringer Mar 19 '12 at 20:45

I'm not sure why you are playing with the string character by character. Isn't this simpler?

def decrement_string(s):
    try:
      i = int(s)
      i = i - 1
      return str(i)
    except:
      # do something else
      return "that's no number!"

while True:
  s = raw_input("give me a number and I'll decrement it for you: ")
  print decrement_string(s)
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1  
I'm glad you put in error checking. It's usually best to check for the specific exception you want to catch, though; in this case, ValueError. For quick-and-dirty checking you can use except Exception: which in recent versions of Python will not catch SystemExit or KeyboardInterrupt. I didn't even know you could just say except: and I'm not sure what it does. I just tried it and it does seem to work. –  steveha Mar 20 '12 at 1:46

The solution to your specific problem of "decrementing" strings is to convert s to an int with int(s), decrease that, and convert back to a str: str(int(s)-1).

In [175]: str(int('100')-1)
Out[175]: '99'

The general solution is to not attempt to alter the elements of a string; use some other type to represent your work, and convert to a string as the last step.

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Python strings are immutable so you cannot modify them. You have to create a new string that contains the value that you need. You are better off converting the string to an integer, decrementing it, and then converting it back to an integer again.

The reason for immutable strings is primarily efficiency.

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Strings aren't mutable, but lists are. You can easily convert the string to a list of individual characters:

l = list(s)

Then convert it back:

s = ''.join(l)

Since you're working with a numeric string there are more direct approaches, but this answer works for the general case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for noting that lists work! –  John Hoffman Mar 20 '12 at 6:26
    
@JohnHoffman, the usual way to say "thanks" is to hit the up arrow on the left! And you're very welcome. Edit: pardon me if you already upvoted - it seems it was followed by a downvote for some reason. –  Mark Ransom Mar 20 '12 at 13:13

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