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I'm learning CSS and html and am stuck on retaining the look of the hover/active state after an item has been clicked. I've looked at several posts on this site and haven't been able to apply the lesson to my application. I also found a solution here http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200503/setting_the_current_menu_state_with_css/ but it didn't work for me (I'll assume it's my fault).

Another source suggested using a span class which is what I'm currently trying. I want to have the same hover color (#fff), weight (bold), and background image in use when a menu item is selected to show the user exactly where they are (this is in the secondary sidebar nav and comes in to use on those pages where the main nav has a dropdown with multiple otions). The only characteristic that's working for me is the bold text. You can see the work in progress here:

http://www.mentalwarddesign.net/dynamec/About/index.html

I'm assuming the class I've created in the span is being overridden, but I'm at a loss as to the remedy. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.

Following is the code for the li and then the corresponding CSS. Thanks in advance!

<ul class="nav">
<span class="chosen"><li><a href="index.html" id="nav-whatwedo">What We Do</a></li></span>
<li><a href="howitstarted.html" id="nav-howitstarted">How It Started</a></li>
<li><a href="whoweare.html" id="nav-whoweare">Who We Are</a></li>
<li><a href="whatweknow.html" id="nav-whatweknow">What We Know</a></li>
</ul>

.chosen {
font-weight: bold;
color: #ffffff;
background-image: url(../imgGlobal/bulletRight.jpg);
background-repeat: no-repeat;
display: block;
padding-left: -12px;
background-position: 168px;
}
.content ul, .content ol {
padding: 0 15px 15px 40px;
background-color: #fff;
}
ul.nav {
list-style: none;
}
ul.nav li {
border-bottom-width: 1px;
border-bottom-style: solid;
border-bottom-color: #464646;
height: 50px;
background-color: #000;
}
ul.nav a, ul.nav a:visited {
display: block;
width: 160px;
text-decoration: none;
padding-top: 12px;
padding-right: 5px;
padding-left: 15px;
}
ul.nav a:hover, ul.nav a:active, ul.nav a:focus {
color: #ffffff;
font-weight: bold;
height: 38px;
background-image: url(../imgGlobal/bulletRight.jpg);
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-position: 168px;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ed, the CSS selector :active means "Being activated (e.g. by being clicked on)", not "Having an href attribute that resolves to the URL of the current page". You can use server-side logic to insert a class=”chosen” or similar. E.g:

<li class="chosen"><a href="index.html">What We Do</a></li>

And, CSS style: ul.nav li.chosen a { }

There is another way to do it as mentioned on the tutorial link you gave, however it is not a good example.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for clarifying the :active selector for me. I was confusing it. Others here have gotten me on the right track by losing the span and putting the chosen class in the li. But the descendant selector you've provided is the icing on the cake enabling me to override the color attribute of another selector. (I'd been fumbling around trying to figure that one out for an hour) Thanks so much to you and everyone else. What a terrific resource this is for a guy like me who's just getting his feet wet. You folks rock! –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 22:28
    
Your welcome :) –  Stella Lie Mar 31 '12 at 12:04

Well first of all, you cannot wrap an li inside of a span. The only direct descendent of a ul is a li. You can put the class chosen directly on to the li and it works just fine.

<ul class="nav">
    <li class="chosen"><a href="index.html" id="nav-whatwedo">What We Do</a></li>
    <li><a href="howitstarted.html" id="nav-howitstarted">How It Started</a></li>
    <li><a href="whoweare.html" id="nav-whoweare">Who We Are</a></li>
    <li><a href="whatweknow.html" id="nav-whatweknow">What We Know</a></li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, it won't. You'll need it in the a. –  JHollanti Mar 19 '12 at 20:15
    
Thanks for letting me know what I was doing wrong. This works great with the background image and bold attribute, but the color (#FFF) still seems to be overridden. Any idea there? –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 20:34
    
Jhol: you're wrong. @ed: Its a problem of specificity. Try something that selects the item more specifically. I'm on the bus home from work so I can't check in detail but I'll check back this evening if you don't have a solution. –  Chris Sobolewski Mar 19 '12 at 20:52
    
@ChrisSobolewski How am i wrong? –  JHollanti Mar 19 '12 at 21:11
    
@Chris: Okay, I understand what you're saying, just not positive how to go about it. I'm gonna give it a go tho. Thanks –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 21:22

Put the chosen class in the li element itself. Drop the span altogether.

EDIT: Sorry, in the a element, i meant to say.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, works great. Any reason it still wouldn't be picking up the #FFF color? Appreciate your help. –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 20:31
    
@EdWard Hmm, that should do it. Unless you have some other rule which overrides the color? –  JHollanti Mar 19 '12 at 20:38
    
Yes I have a class ".nav li a" which sets the font style & color (didn't have it grouped with the rest of my sidebar CSS. That must be my bad guy... –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 20:55
    
@EdWard Sounds like a solid solution. You can always add !important to your css rule, like so: color: #ffffff !important. –  JHollanti Mar 19 '12 at 21:10
    
I was hoping !important would do the trick. Oh well. Still trying to figure out how to override ".nav li a" in this one instance. Been playing with some descendant selectors, but no luck yet. Ah, to be a beginner! :) –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 22:11

A span is a tag, a class is just an identifier. They don't really have anything to do with one another except a class can be used to apply a style to a span but that's true of any tag.

In your case you're trying to put a span (an inline element) around an li (a block level element). In HTML inline elements should not contain block elements.

You should be able to just do it like this: EDIT fixed based on the actual CSS

<li><a href="index.html" class="chosen" id="nav-whatwedo">What We Do</a></li>
share|improve this answer
    
Your suggestion would work if he had a css selector of the following type: li.chosen a, but since he only has .chosen it needs to go to a directly. –  JHollanti Mar 19 '12 at 20:27
    
@JHollanti - you are correct. Edited to fix –  Cfreak Mar 19 '12 at 20:32
    
Thanks as well I appreciate the lesson. Any reason you could think of why I'm still not getting the font color attribute (#FFF)? –  Ed Ward Mar 19 '12 at 20:36

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