Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

(This is for C, Unix in tcsh.)

I'm trying to write a string to an external file (output), then compare my output to the file input. If the output exists in that file, I want to print "Record found." If the output does not exist in that file, I want to print "Record not found."

I'm using a while loop to compare output to input. I have the bit working where if the record is found, the loop terminates and prints "Record found."

I can't get the "else" part to work. Please see my comment in the code about this.

I've been reading my text, notes, and googling for 48 hours. I can't seem to fix this.

Thanks for any help.

    /*This program opens a file, compares output to file input*/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define FILE_NAME "~/MyFiles/File1"

int main() {

FILE *fp;
char *input;
char *output;
output = "MyName";
input = "new name"; /*I get a compiler error if I don't initialize input*/
int found = 0;

/*Open file, write output ("MyName") to file in order to compare below*/
fp = fopen(FILE_NAME, "a+");
fprintf(fp, "%s\n", output);
fclose(fp);

/*Testing to see what it prints, not relevant to my question other than reopening the         
file to read in and compare below*/
fp = fopen(FILE_NAME, "r");
fscanf(fp, "%s", input);
printf("\n%s", input);

while (!found) {
    if (strcmp(input, "MyName") == 0) {
       printf("Record found.");
       found = 1;
   }
/*This is the part I can't get to work. I don't know what's off.*/
    else {
       printf("Record not found."); /*Printing this so I can see how many times it's 
 checking. It never terminates. How do I get it to scan through the file ONCE and then 
 stop?*/
       fscanf(fp, "%s", input);
       found = 0; /*I thought this was my loop terminator, but it has no effect.*/
   }
}

fclose(fp);
return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
You get compiler error on your first comment because you have not allocated memory so that newName can be stored in it. If you don't have to do initialization, allocate sufficient memory and strcpy the string to the memory pointed. Also if you are doing an initalization, do const char* input = "new name"; –  Mahesh Mar 19 '12 at 20:46

2 Answers 2

found=0;

0 is falsy in c. So if at the top you are looping on

while(!found)

that will evaluate to true. Since you're not exiting the loop on EOF, then if it isn't in the file, if the output isn't in the file exactly as you're expecting it, then you'll loop forever.

In other news, you should really give some consideration to buffers and how they ought to be allocated in C.

share|improve this answer

This:

found = 0; /*I thought this was my loop terminator, but it has no effect.*/

has no effect, because found is already 0 at this point, and because your loop condition is while (!found), which means "while found is not nonzero", i.e., "while found is zero".

But that's fine. The real problem is that this:

fscanf(fp, "%s", input);

will eventually reach the end of the file, and return EOF, but you don't check its return value; so if you reach the end of the file without finding the record, then you never exit the loop.

So, you can change this:

while (!found) {
    if (strcmp(input, "MyName") == 0) {
       printf("Record found.");
       found = 1;
   }
/*This is the part I can't get to work. I don't know what's off.*/
    else {
       printf("Record not found."); /*Printing this so I can see how many times it's 
 checking. It never terminates. How do I get it to scan through the file ONCE and then 
 stop?*/
       fscanf(fp, "%s", input);
       found = 0; /*I thought this was my loop terminator, but it has no effect.*/
   }
}

to this:

while (!found) {
    if (strcmp(input, "MyName") == 0) {
       found = 1;
    } else {
       if(fscanf(fp, "%s", input) == EOF) { // end-of-file (or error)
           break;
       }
   }
}
if(found) {
   printf("Record found.\n");
} else {
   printf("Record not found.\n");
}

Edited to add: I just saw Mahesh's comment above, which makes a good point. You also need to change these two lines:

char *input;

input = "new name"; /*I get a compiler error if I don't initialize input*/

to something like this:

char input[1024]; /* allocate space for up to 1024 characters */

and this:

fscanf(fp, "%s", input)

to something this:

fscanf(fp, "%1023s", input) /* read at most 1023 characters */

in both places.

share|improve this answer
    
I am in an intro to C class and we haven't yet covered malloc (term is now over after this week's final, so I'll learn that on my own). It's hard being new to this and still missing such basic stuff. Thank you so much for the helpful responses! –  user1279438 Mar 19 '12 at 21:38
    
@user1279438: I've edited my answer to give an alternative that doesn't require malloc -- and that is probably superior anyway. –  ruakh Mar 19 '12 at 21:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.