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I have a XmlDocument like this:

<Root>
  <Settings>
    <PresentationSettings>
    </PresentationSettings>
  </Settings>
</Root>

When I set the InnerXml of <PresentationSettings> with this text...

<Desktop>
  <WidgetElements>
    <WidgetElement Name="1">
    </WidgetElement>
    <WidgetElement Name="2">
    </WidgetElement>
  </WidgetElements>
</Desktop>

..., the output file is saved like this:

<Root>
  <Settings>
    <PresentationSettings>
      <Desktop>
  <WidgetElements>
    <WidgetElement Name="1">
    </WidgetElement>
    <WidgetElement Name="2">
    </WidgetElement>
  </WidgetElements>
</Desktop>
    </PresentationSettings>
  </Settings>
</Root>

It seems that the root of the InnerXml (i.e. <Desktop>) is starting from the right indented column, but rest of the InnerXml preserves it`s original indentation. I tried a lot of methods, but all of them are giving the exact same output. The methods I tried were:

  • XmlTextWriter with Formatting = Formatting.Indented.
  • XmlWriter with XmlWriterSettings { Indent = true }.
  • Converting to XDocument with both the above methods.
  • Using XmlDocumentFragment.

Can anybody point me in the write direction? What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
White space is not significant in XML - why are you trying to "solve" this issue? –  Oded Mar 19 '12 at 20:52
    
I am a little nuts about things being in perfect order. :P Although it will hardly affect my application, but I still want to know that why is this happening, and how can it be fixed. –  Yogesh Mar 19 '12 at 21:06
    
It is happening because whitespace is not significant to XML - it doesn't matter so why waste code and CPU cycles on it? –  Oded Mar 19 '12 at 21:27
    
Sometimes things like wasted code/time/CPU cycles, or no affect on execution do not matter. But the correct output does. –  Yogesh Mar 20 '12 at 6:56
    
That's my point. It is correct output. –  Oded Mar 20 '12 at 9:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use XDocument or XElement, XmlDocument is .Net 2.0 aka antiquated.

Instead write:

XElement root = XElement.Parse("<Root><Settings><PresentationSettings></PresentationSettings></Settings></Root>");
XElement pSettings = root.Element("Settings").Element("PresentationSettings");
pSettings.Add(otherContentXml);
root.Save(fileName);
or
string formattedXml = root.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
I know I can use XElement to do it, but the library is too big to translate to 4.0. But still, as this is the correct answer, which I too know (:P) I am accepting it. BTW, pSettings.Add(otherContentXml); will convert the <> signs to &lt; and &gt;. You need to add a XElement passed from the string. –  Yogesh Mar 20 '12 at 6:54

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