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I have a nested list that looks like the following:

my_list = [[3.74, 5162, 13683628846.64, 12783387559.86, 1.81],
 [9.55, 116, 189688622.37, 260332262.0, 1.97],
 [2.2, 768, 6004865.13, 5759960.98, 1.21],
 [3.74, 4062, 3263822121.39, 3066869087.9, 1.93],
 [1.91, 474, 44555062.72, 44555062.72, 0.41],
 [5.8, 5006, 8254968918.1, 7446788272.74, 3.25],
 [4.5, 7887, 30078971595.46, 27814989471.31, 2.18],
 [7.03, 116, 66252511.46, 81109291.0, 1.56],
 [6.52, 116, 47674230.76, 57686991.0, 1.43],
 [1.85, 623, 3002631.96, 2899484.08, 0.64],
 [13.76, 1227, 1737874137.5, 1446511574.32, 4.32],
 [13.76, 1227, 1737874137.5, 1446511574.32, 4.32]]

I then import Numpy, and set print options to (suppress=True). When I create an array:

my_array = numpy.array(my_list)

I can't for the life of me suppress scientific notation:

[[  3.74000000e+00   5.16200000e+03   1.36836288e+10   1.27833876e+10
    1.81000000e+00]
 [  9.55000000e+00   1.16000000e+02   1.89688622e+08   2.60332262e+08
    1.97000000e+00]
 [  2.20000000e+00   7.68000000e+02   6.00486513e+06   5.75996098e+06
    1.21000000e+00]
 [  3.74000000e+00   4.06200000e+03   3.26382212e+09   3.06686909e+09
    1.93000000e+00]
 [  1.91000000e+00   4.74000000e+02   4.45550627e+07   4.45550627e+07
    4.10000000e-01]
 [  5.80000000e+00   5.00600000e+03   8.25496892e+09   7.44678827e+09
    3.25000000e+00]
 [  4.50000000e+00   7.88700000e+03   3.00789716e+10   2.78149895e+10
    2.18000000e+00]
 [  7.03000000e+00   1.16000000e+02   6.62525115e+07   8.11092910e+07
    1.56000000e+00]
 [  6.52000000e+00   1.16000000e+02   4.76742308e+07   5.76869910e+07
    1.43000000e+00]
 [  1.85000000e+00   6.23000000e+02   3.00263196e+06   2.89948408e+06
    6.40000000e-01]
 [  1.37600000e+01   1.22700000e+03   1.73787414e+09   1.44651157e+09
    4.32000000e+00]
 [  1.37600000e+01   1.22700000e+03   1.73787414e+09   1.44651157e+09
    4.32000000e+00]]

If i create a simple array directly:

new_array = numpy.array([1.5, 4.65, 7.845])

I have no problem and it prints as follows:

[ 1.5    4.65   7.845]

Does anyone know what my problem is?

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numpy.set_printoptions controls how numpy arrays are printed. However, there's no option to entirely suppress scientific notatation. It's switching over because you have values ranging from 1e-2 up to 1e9. If you have a smaller range, it won't use scientific notation to display them. Why does it matter how they're displayed with print, though? If you're trying to save it, use savetxt, etc. –  Joe Kington Mar 19 '12 at 21:17
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't quite get your aim here, but if you want the output to appear in non-scientific floats you could do

map(list, my_array)

If it's an issue of roudning on your values you could specify the data-type at creation

my_array = numpy.array(my_list, dtype=numpy.float64)

My guess is that the numpy module guesses that your numbers are best displayed in scientific notation since you have so large numbers.

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I guess what you need is np.set_printoptions(suppress=True), for details see here: http://pythonquirks.blogspot.fr/2009/10/controlling-printing-in-numpy.html

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I had the same problem as the OP, and this worked perfectly. Thank you! –  Andrew Apr 7 '13 at 19:31
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for 1D and 2D arrays you can use np.savetxt to print using a specific format string:

>>> import sys
>>> x = numpy.arange(20).reshape((4,5))
>>> numpy.savetxt(sys.stdout, x, '%5.2f')
 0.00  1.00  2.00  3.00  4.00
 5.00  6.00  7.00  8.00  9.00
10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00
15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00

Your options with numpy.set_printoptions or numpy.array2string in v1.3 are pretty clunky and limited (for example no way to suppress scientific notation for large numbers). It looks like this will change with future versions, with numpy.set_printoptions(formatter=..) and numpy.array2string(style=..).

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