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I am using PHP 5.3.6 from MAMP.

I have a use case where it would be best to use PHP's Iterator interface methods, next(), current(), and valid() to iterate through a collection. A foreach loop will NOT work for me in my particular situation. A simplified while loop might look like

<?php
while ($iter->valid()) {
  // do something with $iter->current()
  $iter->next();
}

Should the above code always work when $iter implements PHP's Iterator interface? How does PHP's foreach keyword deal with Iterators?

The reason I ask is that the code I am writing may be given an ArrayIterator or a MongoCursor. Both implement PHP's Iterator interface but they behave differently. I would like to know if there is a bug in PHP or PHP's Mongo extension.

ArrayIterator::valid() returns true before any call to next() -- immediately after the ArrayIterator is created.

MongoCursor::valid() only returns true after the first call to next(). Therefore the while loop above will never execute.

At risk of being verbose, the following code demonstrates these assertions:

<?php

// Set up array iterator
$arr = array("first");
$iter = new \ArrayIterator($arr);

// Test array iterator
echo(($iter->valid() ? "true" : "false")."\n"); // Echoes true
var_dump($iter->current()."\n");                // "first"
$iter->next();
echo(($iter->valid() ? "true" : "false")."\n"); // Echoes false


// Set up mongo iterator
$m = new \Mongo();
$collection = $m->selectDB("iterTest")->selectCollection("mystuff");
$collection->drop(); // Ensure collection is empty
$collection->insert(array('a' => 'b'));
$miter = $collection->find(); // should find one object

// Test mongo iterator
echo(($miter->valid() ? "true" : "false")."\n"); // Echoes false

$miter->next();

echo(($miter->valid() ? "true" : "false")."\n"); // Echoes true
var_dump($miter->current());                     // Array(...)

Which implementation is correct? I found little documentation to support either behavior, and the official PHP documentation is either ambiguous or I'm reading it wrong. The doc for Iterator::valid() states:

This method is called after Iterator::rewind() and Iterator::next() to check if the current position is valid.

This would suggest that my while loop should first call next().

Yet the PHP documentation for Iterator::next states:

This method is called after each foreach loop.

This would suggest that my while loop is correct as written.

To summarize - how should PHP iterators behave?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is an interesting question. I'm not sure why a foreach won't work for you, but I have some ideas.

Take a look at the example given on the Iterator interface reference page. It shows the order in which PHP's internal implementation of foreach calls the Iterator methods. In particular, notice that when the foreach is first set up, the very first call is to rewind(). This example, though it's not well-annotated, is the basis for my answer.

I'm not sure why a MongoCursor would not return true for valid() until after next() is called, but you should be able to reset either type of object by calling rewind() prior to your loop. So you would have:

// $iter may be either MongoCursor or ArrayIterator

$iter->rewind();
while( $iter->valid() ){
    // do something with $iter->current()
    $iter->next();
}

I believe this should work for you. If it does not, the Mongo class may have a bug in it.

Edit: Mike Purcell's answer correctly calls out that ArrayIterator and Iterator are not the same. However, ArrayIterator implements Iterator, so you should be able to use rewind() as I show above on either of them.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good approach as well, to rewind the iterator so ANY iterator instance will behave correctly when valid() is called. Due to inheritance, ArrayIterator's valid will supersede Iterator's version. –  Mike Purcell Mar 19 '12 at 21:54
    
Calling rewind() on the MongoIterator does make it behave like the ArrayIterator. Thank you! (I am not used to an interface's behavior being defined only in documentation examples.) –  meva Mar 20 '12 at 14:35

Subclassing any Iterator and echo'ing when it's called will tell you how it behaves.

Example (demo)

class MyArrayIterator extends ArrayIterator
{
    public function __construct ($array)
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        parent::__construct($array);
    }
    …
}

foreach (new MyArrayIterator(range(1,3)) as $k => $v) {
    echo "$k => $v", PHP_EOL;
}

Output

MyArrayIterator::__construct
MyArrayIterator::rewind
MyArrayIterator::valid
MyArrayIterator::current
MyArrayIterator::key
0 => 1
MyArrayIterator::next
MyArrayIterator::valid
MyArrayIterator::current
MyArrayIterator::key
1 => 2
MyArrayIterator::next
MyArrayIterator::valid
MyArrayIterator::current
MyArrayIterator::key
2 => 3
MyArrayIterator::next
MyArrayIterator::valid

This is equivalent to doing

$iterator = new MyArrayIterator(range(1,3));
for ($iterator->rewind(); $iterator->valid(); $iterator->next()) {
    echo "{$iterator->key()} => {$iterator->current()}", PHP_EOL;
}

The sequence in which the methods are called is identical to a custom Iterator:

class MyIterator implements Iterator
{
    protected $iterations = 0;
    public function current()
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        return $this->iterations;
    }
    public function key ()
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        return $this->iterations;
    }
    public function next ()
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        return $this->iterations++;
    }
    public function rewind ()
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        return $this->iterations = 0;
    }
    public function valid ()
    {
        echo __METHOD__, PHP_EOL;
        return $this->iterations < 3;
    }
}
foreach (new MyIterator as $k => $v) {
    echo "$k => $v", PHP_EOL;
}
share|improve this answer

It seems you may have mixed up Iterator and ArrayIterator, as each has their own valid() api call.

  • Array Iterator : There is no specific mention to next() etc, but the example clearly demonstrates what you mentioned in your OP, to paraphrase; that no other AI api call needs to be made to determine if current element of array is valid.

  • Iterator : As you mention: "This method is called after Iterator::rewind() and Iterator::next() to check if the current position is valid."

As such, I would stick with ArrayIterator, as it demonstrates the most correct behavior, in that valid() will correctly determine if current element in array is valid, without having to make another api call (next, rewind).

If you want get Mongo to behave like AI does, you could add an instance check before starting the while loop:

if ($iter instanceof MongoCursor) {
   $iter->next()
}

while ($iter->valid()) {
    // Do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
While checking the class of the iterator would certainly work, the whole point of using an interface is that the code does not have to know or check the actual class of the object. The interface implies that certain behavior can be expected of any implementation. I was confused about what that behavior should be for Iterator. –  meva Mar 20 '12 at 14:43
    
"I was confused about what that behavior should be for Iterator", but your code snippet was using ArrayIterator. –  Mike Purcell Mar 20 '12 at 16:40

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