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This is an interview type question....

Suppose that you create a simple Simple Object Notation Language...we will call it LON for Lean Object Notation. It only works for rows and fields, similar to a mysql table. Each row is separated by a || and each field is separate by a |...Like this...

field 1 | field 2 || field 1 | field 2 || field 1 | field 2 ||

The code for creating this is pretty straight forward...here it is for one case in PHP: Mark::fieldM = | and Mark::rowM = ||

public static function row( $function, $array_2d )
{
    $iter = 0;
    foreach( $array_2d as $array_row )
    {
        if( $iter != 0 )  
        {
            Mark::$stringReturn = Mark::$stringReturn . Mark::rowM;
        }
        ++$iter;
        call_user_func( $function, $array_row ); 
    }
    return self::$stringReturn;
}


public static function fieldBookmark($array1D)
{
    $array1D = Mark::escape($array1D);
    Mark::$stringReturn = Mark::$stringReturn 
        . $array1D['domain'] 
        . Mark::fieldM 
        . $array1D['url']
        . Mark::fieldM 
        . $array1D['title'];
}

To escape it you use :

$array_row[ $key ] = str_replace( array( '*', '|' ), array( '**','|*' ), $array_row[ $key ] );

which of course is applied to the content in the fields to make sure if the user uses the | sign it is not misinterpreted as a field marker.

* becomes ** and | becomes |*

To parse the data on the client side using JavaScript you use

first_split = embeddedAml.split( /\|\|(?!\*)/ );
for( element_count = 0; element_count < first_split.length; element_count++ )
{
    second_split = first_split[ element_count ].split( /\|(?!\*)/ ); 
    second_split = ViewH.unEscape( second_split );
    passed_function( second_split );
}

This allow you to split on || but not ||* for the rows

and to split on

| but not on |*

for the fields.

The unEscape() function then removes the special characters as such:

unEscape: function ( second_split )
{
    var element;
    for( element in second_split )
    {
        second_split[element] = second_split[element].replace( '**', '*', 'g' );
        second_split[element] = second_split[element].replace( '|*', '|', 'g' );
    }
    return second_split;
},

This works on all cases except one.

If you make the very first character of user input a * it combines with the end of field marker | and it is now not properly recognized as a field but as an escaped special character.

For example

some content in field 1 |*content in field 2 |* more in field 2 | field 3 ||

is broken because the of the first astricks....field 2 has now disappeared because the field marker | looks like a user entered special character |*

How do I properly escaped, split and unescape data?

Is it possible with this method does someone know the best practice way to escape data?

share|improve this question
    
I don't really think replacing substrings is the best way to write a parser! Maybe look for some kind of parser generator to which you can feed a grammar spec. –  James McLaughlin Mar 19 '12 at 21:38
    
Is there a reason why you wouldn't use JSON ? json.org instead of reinventing the wheel ? ;) –  Stock Overflaw Mar 19 '12 at 21:43
    
@Stack - If I write it in C it will be faster than JSON... –  user656925 Mar 19 '12 at 21:50
    
@James - what is a parser generator...I've heard of grammars with in the context of compilers..but not parser generators...any links –  user656925 Mar 19 '12 at 21:50
1  
@GuyMontag What makes you think it'll be faster? Is JSON parsing really your bottleneck? –  James McLaughlin Mar 19 '12 at 22:34

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