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I'm trying to write a simple calculator program on Java. My first calculator program didn't have any problems registering the boolean flags signifying the operator as true or false (it dealt only with addition and subtraction) but when I implemented multiplication and division into the boolean, everything gets registered as true so that all the results for every operation is listed.

package com.arrdude.jason;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.lang.Math;

public class RegularCalculator {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int var1 = 0;
    int var2 = 0;
    int operator = 0;
    boolean isAdd=false, isSub=false, isMult=false, isDiv=false;


try{
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

    System.out.println ("Enter the first number");
    var1=Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());

    System.out.println ("Enter the second number");
    var2=Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());

    System.out.println ("Which function do you wish you use? Enter 1 for addition, 2 for subtraction, 3 for multiplication, 4 for division");
    operator=Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());

}
catch(NumberFormatException ne) {
    System.out.println("Invalid number" + ne);
    System.exit(0);
}
catch(IOException ioe) {
    System.out.println ("IO Error" + ioe);
    System.exit(0);
}

if (operator==1){
    isAdd=true;
}
else{
    isAdd=false;
}
if (operator==2){
    isSub=true;
}
else{
    isSub=false;
}
/*if (operator==3){
    isMult=true;
}
else {
    isMult=false;
}
if (operator==4){
    isDiv=true;
}
else {
    isDiv=false;
}
*/
if(isAdd=true) {
    int result = var1 + var2;
    System.out.println("The result is " + result);
}
if(isSub=true) {
    int result = var1 - var2;
    System.out.println("The result is " + result);
}
if(isMult=true) {
    int result = var1 * var2;
    System.out.println ("The result is " + result);
}
if(isDiv=true) {
    int result = var1 / var2;
    System.out.println("The result is " + result);
}
}

}

If anyone can understand why this is happening, it'd be great. I'm pretty new to Java so I may have overlooked something that doesn't necessarily look out of place to a green eye. If you run the program, you should understand what kind of issue I'm running into.

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I am fairly certain the compiler warns on this... and, if so, shame on ... –  user166390 Mar 19 '12 at 21:03

4 Answers 4

If your last block of if statements, you have if(isAdd=true) and so on. This needs to be if(isAdd==true) (or even better, just if(isAdd)).

In fact, you could streamline things by just getting rid of all of the if statements and doing a switch statement based on the operator variable.

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2  
I have found that one way to avoid subtle bugs like this is to flip the order of the comparison (e.g. if (true==isAdd)). Then, if I leave out the second equals sign, I will get a compiler error about an illegal lvalue in the assignment. –  John Haager Mar 19 '12 at 22:43

At the end of your code, you have isAdd=true. This is the assignment operator. In this statement, you are assigning true to isAdd, and then effectively evaluating is(true) {.

In order to fix this, you should change your statements to:

if(isAdd==true) {
    int result = var1 + var2;
    System.out.println("The result is " + result);
}

Moreover, many of your if statements are superfluous. You can change the following:

if (operator==1){
    isAdd=true;
}
else{
    isAdd=false;
}

to isAdd = (operator == 1);, and so on.

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The if statements are assignments, not equality checks:

if(isAdd=true)

which will always be true.

Change to:

if(isAdd==true)

or just:

if(isAdd)

Same for the other if statements.

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One problem is that all conditions if(is...=true) is always true. And you don't need to set is... to false explicitly, because you set it to false already at the top.

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