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Thanks guys for fixing the infinity problem I was getting from my last question:

Infinity in interest calculation?

Lately though I've been forwarded emails from customers complaining that the numbers they are getting on their end do not add up correctly - but I don't see how that can be possible. I tested this out myself using values i've put in my test app below but I'm just not seeing the problem - the results come out correctly ($352.24) according to the other interest program I'm using when I type in the values. I'm not sure where else to look, could someone please help me figure out what's going on here?

Here is the modified code I am testing with:

static float money;

static void Main()
{
    //string[] myMaybeBalances = Accounts.GetStartingBalances();
    string[] myMaybeBalances = new string[1];
    myMaybeBalances[0] = "123.45";

    myIsMaybeMoneyValidator Miimv = new myIsMaybeMoneyValidator();

    ArrayList interests = Miimv.interestsAccrued(myMaybeBalances);
    foreach (object interest in interests)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(interest);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}

public ArrayList interestsAccrued(string[] myMaybeBalances)
{
    ArrayList interests = new ArrayList();
    foreach (string myMaybeBalance in myMaybeBalances)
    {
        bool myResult = isMaybeMoney(myMaybeBalance);
        if (myResult == true)
        {
            //decimal[] rates = Accounts.GetRates();
            decimal[] rates = new decimal[1];
            rates[0] = (decimal)0.0350;

            for (int i = 0; i < rates.Length; i++)
            {
                decimal rate = rates[i];
                float total = money;

                int n_X_t = 360;
                while (n_X_t != 0)
                {
                    rate = (1 + rates[i] / 12);
                    float myRate;
                    float.TryParse(rate.ToString(), out myRate);

                    total = total * myRate;
                    n_X_t = n_X_t - 1;
                }
                interests.Add(total);
            }
        }
    }
    return interests;
}

public bool isMaybeMoney(object theirMaybeMoney)
{
    string myMaybeMoney = theirMaybeMoney.ToString();

    float num;
    bool isValid = float.TryParse(myMaybeMoney,
    NumberStyles.Currency,
    CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US"), // cached
    out num);

    money = num;
    return isValid;
}

EDIT:

I tried changing it to

rate = (1 + rates[i] / 12.0); 

and I am getting this error when I click the green play button:

Error 1 Operator '/' cannot be applied to operands of type 'decimal' and 'double' C:\Users\dave\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\ConsoleApplication2\ConsoleApplication2\Program.cs 74 41 ConsoleAp‌​plication2

share|improve this question
5  
Ask clients their sample data which gives an error and test on that sample data. –  Victor Sorokin Mar 19 '12 at 21:31
1  
You can't debug if you can't reproduce the bug. Try to know exactly what the customer is doing when the error occurs –  Mathieu Mar 19 '12 at 21:34
    
why are you using float for monetary calculation, use decimal that's what its for. –  Lloyd Mar 19 '12 at 21:42
    
@VictorSorokin - i do not have direct access to their sample data and even though I've asked for it, they say I do not have clearance to that particular department's data. I wish I could give you guys more information because this is unbelievably frustrating for me –  Raging Dave Mar 19 '12 at 21:48
    
@Lloyd - i am using a decimal, my example uses 123.45 - I also tried without one and that didn't work either ($123). –  Raging Dave Mar 19 '12 at 21:52

1 Answer 1

This string rate = (1 + rates[i] / 12); looks suspicious. If you divide by integer (12) the result will be integer too. Try to change it to rate = (1 + rates[i] / 12.0);

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That won't work. rate is a decimal not a double. You would need rate = (1 + rates[i]/12m), although since rates[i] is already a decimal type, you shouldn't need the cast –  Jetti Mar 19 '12 at 21:40
    
I don't understand - I tried changing it to rate = (1 + rates[i] / 12.0); and I am getting this error when I click the green play button: Error 1 Operator '/' cannot be applied to operands of type 'decimal' and 'double' C:\Users\dave\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\ConsoleApplication2\ConsoleApplication2\Program.cs 74 41 ConsoleAp‌​plication2 –  Raging Dave Mar 19 '12 at 21:57
    
Jetti was correct, you should convert 12 to decimal, not to float as I suggested. So it should be rate = (1 + rates[i]/12m) –  Nikolay Mar 20 '12 at 6:38

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