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I need to figure out a way to handle if results does find something, show "yes, something was found" else show "no users have been found at this time". I've tried to figure this out, but I'm unable to do so. Thank you for your time.

My code is as follows:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Today;
DateTime less5dt = dt.AddDays(-5);
This.cmb1.Items.Clear();

PrincipalSearchResult results =
UserPrincipal.FindByLockoutTime(
     adPrincipalContext,
         dt,
          MatchType.GreaterThanOrEquals);

foreach (Principal result in results)
{
    cmb1.Items.Add(result.name);
}
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1  
Can't you just get a count of the items associated with cmb1? If it's 0, nothing was found, otherwise.... –  Michael Todd Jun 10 '09 at 20:15

6 Answers 6

You can check the length of the results. If its zero, do one thing, if it's larger than zero do another.

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I agree. Use the length in an if statement. –  Bobby Cannon Jun 10 '09 at 20:32
2  
Assuming the MSDN article is accurate, there is no Length property exposed. But the Count property should work the same: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb292002.aspx –  senfo Jun 10 '09 at 20:37

You could add a count/length member to your class.

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if (!results.OfType<Principal>().Any())
{
  //code when nothing is found, here
}

I used OfType because I don't know if your collection implements IEnumerable<Principal>, but I bet it implements IEnumerable.

If you already have a Count property, it is of course "faster" to check that. Measurably faster? Hmm. And you're paying to keep that Count property up-to-date so...

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Is there any benefit in doing it like this instead of just checking results.Count == 0? Results should by documentation never contain an object of type other than Principal and OPs code wouldn't work otherwise anyway. I think results.Count is much clearer. –  Ben Schwehn Jun 10 '09 at 20:28
    
There's no benefit (and Any() may be slightly slower.) –  mquander Jun 10 '09 at 20:39

Since you're looping through the results anyway, it won't hurt you at all to introduce a boolean at the top:

bool hasResults = false;
foreach (Principal result in results)
{
    hasResults = true;
    cmb1.Items.Add(result.name);
}
if (hasResults)
{
    return "yes, something was found";
}
else
{
    return "no users have been found at this time";
}

This code can be shortened, but readability should take precedence.

If you don't need to loop (I understand that you do need to based on the code you posted), you could short circuit the result and exclude the boolean:

foreach (Principal result in results)
{
    return "yes, something was found";
}
return "no users have been found at this time";

The second solution is suitable when you don't have access to a Count property on an enumerable class. It looks from other answers like you do have access to this in this case, but I leave this example in as a hypothetical.

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Not good, at all. The first example, you wastefully assign true each iteration of the loop. You're much better off evaluating the value of the Count property, first. Your second example doesn't even make sense. You've broken the ability to add result.Name to the combo box, not to mention the fact that this would execute only once, so why have it in a loop? Lastly, the method doesn't necessarily return a string, period. –  senfo Jun 10 '09 at 20:33
1  
@senfo, I appreciate the feedback. At least I finally got something explaining the downvotes. Here's my thinking: In the second example, I clearly stated "if you don't need a loop." It's a hypothetical, and it's based on the assumption that Count isn't available. I use this particular solution when you call something that only returns an IEnumerator. I see based on other answers that PrincipalReturnResult has a count property... I simply didn't think it was worth editing out. –  Michael Meadows Jun 10 '09 at 20:37
    
To answer your criticism of the first scenario, the method signature isn't defined. It may well return a string. If not, it could be modified to. The OP never defined how the message was handled... I just guessed. Second, assigning a value of true to a locally scoped boolean costs almost nothing. Checking its existing value or doing a bitwise operation on the boolean would both cost more. In fact, it's possible that calling to Count might even cost more than the assignment operations (depending on the number of iterations that occur). –  Michael Meadows Jun 10 '09 at 20:41

If the MSDN article on the PrincipalSearchResult class is correct, there is a Count property exposed.


if (results.Count > 0)
{
    foreach (Principal result in results)
    {
        cmb1.Items.Add(result.name);
    }
}
else
{
    // Hide contorls and/or show message
}
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You should do something like this

DateTime dt = DateTime.Today;
DateTime less5dt = dt.AddDays(-5);

PrincipalSearchResult results = UserPrincipal.FindByLockoutTime(
    adPrincipalContext,
    dt,
    MatchType.GreaterThanOrEquals);

if (results.Count > 0)
{
    This.cmb1.Items.Clear();
    foreach (Principal result in results)
    {
    	cmb1.Items.Add(result.name);
    }	
}
else
{
    //Considering you have a label called lblMessage
    lblMessage.Text = "no users have been found at this time"
    cmb1.Visible = false;
}
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