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In my smart device application, I have functions which search all discoverable bluetooth devices and connect to the devices with the Windows Mobile 6.5. When I press a button to search Bluetooth devices, the UI freezes and I cannot do anything else. After all the discoverable devices are found the UI is again responsive.

I know I should use Threading to handle this issue. However, I have no success at getting it to work.

Here is the code I use for searching bluetooth devices. In the code, I have two BindingLists. One is DiscoverableDevices and the other is ConnectedSEMDevices which are binding to a listbox and a combo box respectively.

    private void SearchBTDevices()
    {
     // Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate{
        List<BluetoothDevice> list = new List<BluetoothDevice>();
        this.discoverableDevices.Clear();  //DiscoverableDevices is binding to the form
        list.foreach(x => this.Discoverable.Add(x));
        ConnectedSEMDevices.Clear()
        list.Where(x => x.HasAuthenticated).ToList().ForEach(x => ConnectedSEMDevices.Add(x));  // ConnectedSEMDevices is binding to the Form
     // }));
     // thread.Start();
    }

When I uncomment out the Thread in the above code, it doesn't do anything and no devices are found. After I comment out the thread, it works. Does anyone know the reason? I would like to do something else in the same form as the devices are being searched.

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2 Answers 2

Take a look at using a BackgroundWorker thread:

MSDN - BackgroundWorker

What I suspect the problem you are having is that inside the thread you are creating you are trying to bind your results immediately to your UI controls. Basically, when you create a thread like this it is not allowed to talk to any UI elements because they are on different threads.

In your case, I would create a BackgroundWorker, put most of your above code in the DoWork method which populates your lists and then in the RunWorkerCompleted method bind your 'Lists<>' to your user controls.

Update for Compact Framework 3.5:

You are limited to threading only with Thread.Start and Timer:

Threading in Compact Framework

This seems more like what you have to do:

Microsoft .NET Compact Framework Multi-threading Tips

In that case, I would go back to what you were working on. What I am concerned about with your code fragment was that there didn't seem to be a method call to a a method that actually got your bluetooth devices. This is where I would start:

private void SearchBTDevices()
{
    Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
    {
        List<BluetoothDevice> list = new List<BluetoothDevice>();

        // isn't there some method you have that populates your List<BluetoothDevices>????
        list = FindMeMyBluetoothDevices();

        this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => 
        {
            this.discoverableDevices.Clear();
            list.ForEach(x => this.discoverableDevices.Add(x)); 
        }));

        this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => 
        {
            ConnectedSEMDevices.Clear();
            list.Where(x => x.HasAuthenticated).ToList().ForEach(x => ConnectedSEMDevices.Add(x)); 
        }));
    }));

    thread.Start();
} 
share|improve this answer
    
but In Compact Framework, it doesn't have Backgroundworker. Any other options? –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 11:53
    
I think this is what you want to do: Microsoft .NET Compact Framework Multi-threading Tips –  Brad Rem Mar 20 '12 at 15:27
    
Yes, FindMeMyBluetoothDevices() access the Model layer to get the discoverable devices. In the model, I have BluetoothAccess class which will do all the bluetooth stuffs there. –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 15:53
    
Please find my updated code of SearchBTDevices below. –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 16:03
    
@CharlesLAU Instead of a new answer, you should edit your original question. Secondly, the link I mentioned above about Multi-threading tips shows an example of how to update a UI control from within a thread. The problem that you're having is that you're inside a thread trying to access some UI controls. Without 'MethodInvoker', you need to essentially wrap the calls to the UI in Control.Invoke, as per the link. You may have to drop your 'BindingList<T>' and just add your list directly to the UI controls (under Invoke). –  Brad Rem Mar 20 '12 at 18:42

BindingLists raise events as soon as they are modified. If you have bound them to controls, those controls will be notified, but on the wrong thread.

Two options are:

1) Use BackgroundWorker as per BradRem's answer.

2) Call Invoke any time you access your UI controls AND, any time you modify a BindingList that is bound to a control.

 private void SearchBTDevices()
    {
      Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate{
        List<BluetoothDevice> list = new List<BluetoothDevice>();
        this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => this.discoverableDevices.Clear()); //DiscoverableDevices is binding to the form
        list.foreach(x => this.Discoverable.Add(x));

        var connectedDevices = list.Where(x => x.HasAuthenticated).ToList());  
        this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => {
            ConnectedSEMDevices.Clear()
            ConnectedSEMDevices.AddRange(connectedDevices)));}
        }
      }));
  thread.Start();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot access the new MethodInoker –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 13:59
    
In the application, I use MVC model. In the above code, I placed them in the controller layer, how can I use "this.Invoke(...)" in the controller layer to update the UI control. I can only use Thread in the class. So when the DiscoverableDevice or ConnectedSEMDevices bindinglists are updated, it will call its interface to pass them up to the view. I access the view via the Interface, I don't access the form directly in the controller layer class. Any idea? Thanks in advance. –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 15:27
    
Add a method to your IView interface - void Invoke(Action action). Pass that to your controller. So in your controller, you call: view.Invoke(...do your binding list stuff...). So, controls or forms implementing IView already have the method. Mock view in your testing can be implementing just by calling the action. –  Steven P Mar 20 '12 at 21:29
    
I have just tried your way, but when I ran the code, it stop dubugging automatically. Don't know why –  Charles LAU Mar 20 '12 at 22:20
    
Put a try/catch around the threading code and break on any exceptions? –  Steven P Mar 20 '12 at 22:29

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