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How do I use a (generic) vector in go?

I tried to create a new vector but the compiler says it is undefined:

$ 6g -V
6g version release.r60.3 9516
$ cat > vectest.go <<.
> package main
> 
> import vector "container/vector"
> import "fmt"
> 
> func main() {
>      vec := vector.New(0);
>      buf := make([]byte,10);
>      vec.Push(buf);
> 
>      for i := 0; i < vec.Len(); i++ {
>      el := vec.At(i).([]byte);
>      fmt.Print(el,"\n");
>      }
> }
> .
$ 6g vectest.go 
vectest.go:7: undefined: vector.New

What might be wrong ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

weekly.2011-10-18

The container/vector package has been deleted. Slices are better. SliceTricks: How to do vector-esque things with slices.

I revised your convertToLCD code to have better performance: 5,745 ns/op versus 19,003 ns/op.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strconv"
)

const (
    lcdNumerals = `
 _     _  _     _  _  _  _  _ 
| |  | _| _||_||_ |_   ||_||_|
|_|  ||_  _|  | _||_|  ||_| _|
`
    lcdWidth   = 3
    lcdHeight  = 3
    lcdLineLen = (len(lcdNumerals) - 1) / lcdWidth
)

func convertToLCD(n int) string {
    digits := strconv.Itoa(n)
    displayLineLen := len(digits)*lcdWidth + 1
    display := make([]byte, displayLineLen*lcdHeight)
    for i, digit := range digits {
        iPos := i * lcdWidth
        digitPos := int(digit-'0') * lcdWidth
        for line := 0; line < lcdHeight; line++ {
            numeralPos := 1 + lcdLineLen*line + digitPos
            numeralLine := lcdNumerals[numeralPos : numeralPos+lcdWidth]
            displayPos := displayLineLen*line + iPos
            displayLine := display[displayPos : displayPos+lcdWidth]
            copy(displayLine, string(numeralLine))
            if i == len(digits)-1 {
                display[displayLineLen*(line+1)-1] = '\n'
            }
        }
    }
    return string(display)
}

func main() {
    fmt.Printf("%s\n", convertToLCD(1234567890))
}

Output:

    _  _     _  _  _  _  _  _ 
  | _| _||_||_ |_   ||_||_|| |
  ||_  _|  | _||_|  ||_| _||_|
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I end up using, appending slices, not the most performant way though ( suggestions are welcome ) gist.github.com/2129414 –  OscarRyz Mar 20 '12 at 3:02
1  
@OscarRyz: why "not the most performant way"? –  newacct Mar 20 '12 at 5:34
    
@OscarRyz: I've added a faster version of your convertToLCD function to my answer. –  peterSO Mar 20 '12 at 14:44
    
@newacct I meant in my implementation, because I just appeded strings, not that this was terrible or anything, but I'm learning. –  OscarRyz Mar 20 '12 at 20:02

It's true there is no vector.New in r60.3, but rather than patch up this code, you should learn the new append function. It made the vector package unnecessary, and in fact the package was removed some time ago from the weekly releases.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but how do I create a vector in first place? Do you have a sample? :) –  OscarRyz Mar 20 '12 at 0:59
2  
@OscarRyz: var v []t or v := []t{} is all what's needed to have a ready to use vector v of t. –  zzzz Mar 20 '12 at 8:22

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