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This is what I would like to be able to do:

SET @interval_type := MONTH;
SELECT '2012-01-01' + INTERVAL 6 @interval_type;
+------------+
|'2012-06-01'|
+------------+

And of course that doesn't work and there is no "interval" data type in MySQL.

I want to be able to store an interval value and an interval type in a table so that i can have the database quickly do the math naturally without having to write a big switch statement, ala

... ELSE IF (type = 'MONTH') { SELECT @date + INTERVAL @value MONTH; } ... 

Is this supported in any way in MySQL or do you have a clever hack for this?

Thanks; you rock.

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3 Answers 3

You can solve this problem using prepared statements, considering there is no language construct available for use. The benefit here being you get the performance and flexibility that you want; this could easily be placed in a stored procedure or function for added value:

SET @date = '2012-01-01';
SET @value = 6;
SET @type = 'MONTH';

SET @q = 'SELECT ? + INTERVAL ? ';
SET @q = CONCAT(@s, @type);

PREPARE st FROM @q;
EXECUTE st USING @date, @value;

Alternatively, depending on your database / software architecture and the type of date/time intervals you are thinking of, you could simply this problem by using a time-scale interval:

SELECT @date + INTERVAL @value SECOND
  • 1 second - 1
  • 1 minute - 60
  • 1 hour - 3600
  • 1 day - 86400 (24 hours)
  • 1 week - 604800 (7 days)
  • 1 month - 2419200 (4 weeks)
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Alternatively you could use a time-scale interval such as seconds, minutes, or hours, and perform all of your date/time manipulation that way. –  Chris Hutchinson Mar 20 '12 at 0:00
    
Wow, freakshow. Interesting solution. Might be performance problems with this though, even if executed on the server, since each statement needs to be prepared first before execution. Not a big deal for one or two, but a few thousand would add up. Reducing all calculations to "seconds" does not work in this case because the default way that MySQL handles intervals is a bit fuzzy. 2012-01-01 + INTERVAL 1 YEAR will result in 2013-01-01. If reduced to seconds, it would produce something a bit weirder due to days_per_month and leap years, etc. –  lev Mar 20 '12 at 0:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's the simplistic approach. It works reasonably fast. You can change the order of the switch statements to optimize for speed if you feel that you will be hitting some more often then others. I have not benched this against Chris Hutchinson's solution. I ran into problems trying to wrap it into a nice function because of the dynamic SQL. Anyway, for posterity, this is guaranteed to work:

CREATE FUNCTION AddInterval( date DATETIME, interval_value INT, interval_type TEXT  ) 
RETURNS DATETIME
DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
    DECLARE newdate DATETIME;
    SET newdate = date;

    IF interval_type = 'YEAR' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value YEAR;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'QUARTER' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value QUARTER;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'MONTH' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value MONTH;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'WEEK' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value WEEK;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'DAY' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value DAY;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'MINUTE' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value MINUTE;
    ELSEIF interval_type = 'SECOND' THEN
        SET newdate = date + INTERVAL interval_value SECOND;
    END IF;

    RETURN newdate;
END //

It comes with this equally simplistic benchmark test:

CREATE FUNCTION `TestInterval`( numloops INT ) 
RETURNS INT
DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
    DECLARE date DATETIME;
    DECLARE newdate DATETIME;
    DECLARE i INT; 
    SET i = 0;

    label1: LOOP
        SET date = FROM_UNIXTIME(RAND() * 2147483647);
        SET newdate = AddInterval(date,1,'YEAR');
        SET i = i+1;
        IF i < numloops THEN
            ITERATE label1;
        ELSE
            LEAVE label1;
        END IF;
    END LOOP label1;
    return i;
END //
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This solution may come handy to somebody implementing the job queue for cron or something similar.

Let us suppose we have a reference date (DATETIME) and interval of repetition. We would like to store both values in database and get the quick comparison whether it's already time to execute and include job into execution queue or not. The interval could be non trivial e.g. (1 YEAR 12 DAYS 12 HOUR) and is controlled by wise user (admin) so that user is not going to use values exceeding the range of regular DATETIME data type or otherwise the conversion must be implemented first. (18 MONTH -> 1 YEAR 6 MONTH).

We can use then DATETIME data type for storing both values reference date and interval. We can define stored function using:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE DEFINER=`my_db`@`%` FUNCTION `add_interval`(`source` DATETIME, `interval` DATETIME) RETURNS datetime
BEGIN
  DECLARE result DATETIME;

  SET result = `source`;
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(YEAR FROM `interval`) YEAR);
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(MONTH FROM `interval`) MONTH);
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(DAY FROM `interval`) DAY);
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(HOUR FROM `interval`) HOUR);
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(MINUTE FROM `interval`) MINUTE);
  SET result=DATE_ADD(result, INTERVAL EXTRACT(SECOND FROM `interval`) SECOND);

RETURN result;
END

We can then make DATETIME arithmetic using this function e.g.

// test solution
SELECT add_interval('2014-07-24 15:58:00','0001-06-00 00:00:00');

// get job from schedule table
SELECT job FROM schedule WHERE add_interval(last_execution,repetition)<NOW();

// update date of executed job
UPDATE schedule SET last_execution=add_interval(last_execution,repetition);
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