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My one activity seems to have grown quite a bit and I feel like that things should be more object oriented somehow. I think it happens because I am just learning and therefore keep adding different views, to see things working. Before I know it, it has gotten big.

I have subclassed things like LinearLayout, ViewFlipper, Button, TextView, etc etc and thought that providing constructors for these classes that take arguments like textsize, font, layout parameters, background color etc etc might help the situation and actually might lend itself more towards OOP common design paradigms. Doing it this way of course means that my constructor will have tons of arguments.

I was wondering if I could get some feedback on this approach above: should I use my subclasses to my advantage for a more OOP design, or do some activities just naturally have lots of code? Thanks!

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This is OOP, not only Android/ Java. –  user942821 Mar 20 '12 at 0:11

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I have subclassed things like LinearLayout, ViewFlipper, Button, TextView, etc etc and thought that providing constructors for these classes that take arguments like textsize, font, layout parameters, background color etc etc might help the situation and actually might lend itself more towards OOP common design paradigms.

That's not a good idea. Widgets are not designed to be extended as a means of configuration. Moreover, it is not necessary, as all the things you list can (and should) be defined in XML layout resources.

do some activities just naturally have lots of code?

Some activities are responsible for lots of code. You are welcome to pull some of that logic out into other classes, but they would not necessarily be subclasses of widgets. Your Adapters, various ...Listeners, AsyncTasks, Loader.Callbacks, and so forth can frequently be pulled out into separate public classes, rather than having your activity implement a zillion interfaces or have bunches of inner classes.

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I appreciate your response. As a few people have asked me before(as to why i am not building things in xml layouts) I will respond again and say that the reason I am building it all in code is that I dont know what things are going to be ahead of time. A lot of the information coming into the activity comes from a sqlite database. In general most of my views are dynamic and changed based on other events, callbacks, listeners...etc. –  cspam Mar 20 '12 at 0:15
    
When talking about OOP with code refactoring, I don't think isolate inner class like AsyncTask from Activity is a good practice. I don't see any real benefits you can gain by doing this other than adding complexity like resolving references between classes to development. I agree big Activity class (thousands of line) looks nasty. But Java has its reason to have inner class syntax. when doing code reactoring, think more at problem abstraction level, instead of simply pull inner class out from Activity at code level. –  yorkw Mar 20 '12 at 0:42
    
yeah right now my activity class is 242 lines of code, including spaces and what not - just going by the number of lines that eclipse says.i didnt know if that was considered usual or average for something that was purely code(not xml at all) and quite involved. –  cspam Mar 20 '12 at 3:51

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