Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I heard someone once say that compilers frequently move the loop conditions to the bottom of the loop. That is, loops like these:

while (condition) {
    ...
}

is changed to :

if (condition) {
     do {
         ...
     } while (condition);
}

regarding machine independent optimization, why is latter preferable?

share|improve this question
    
In fact, the second loop does not evaluate the condition at the top of the loop. It jumps down to the while condition, where it continues as though it had just finished an iteration. –  Kendall Frey Mar 20 '12 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

Without compiler optimisation, the first loop goes to assembly code like this:

  @@:
cmp ... ; or test ...
jz @f

...
jmp @b

Whereas the second loop goes to something like this:

jmp bottom

  @@:
...

  bottom:
cmp ... ; or test ...
jz @b

Conditional jumps are usually predicted to be taken so the first method could potentially lead to more pipeline/instruction cache flushes.

However, the most important thing is that for the first loop, there are two branches available per loop iteration (2N), whereas in the second, each loop iteration only has one branch with a fixed overhead of the first unconditional jump (N+1).

For more information on loop optimisation, see page 88 of this assembly optimisation guide.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for mentioning the branch predictor, however, you forgot the unconditional jump in the second example. (Second example is a do loop, we want a while loop.) You are incorrect in saying the second loop takes less space. –  Kendall Frey Mar 20 '12 at 0:30
    
@KendallFrey: Good catch, updated the code. –  Mike Kwan Mar 20 '12 at 0:35
    
Does an CFG constructed from the second 'loop structure' has any benefit that isn't present when constructing it from the first loop? I mean, is it more optimization prone? –  JohnTortugo Mar 20 '12 at 1:24
    
@JohnTortugo: I can't give you concrete evidence for this, but I would think a smart optimising compiler would treat both the same since they are both semantically equivalent and can be formally proved as such fairly easily. –  Mike Kwan Mar 20 '12 at 1:27

You are partially mistaken. The typical optimization is this:

    jmp $test;
$loop:
    ; loop statements
$test:
    test <condition>;
    branch-true $loop;

rather than this:

$loop:
    test <condition>;
    branch-false $end;
    ; loop statements
    branch loop;
$end:

which has two branches in every iteration of the loop. Another advantage is that the part after the initial jump is identical to the code generated for do/while.

share|improve this answer

For the assembly view, a loop is just a jump instruction that jump backward of the code. So compiler need to insert a jump at the end of the loop.

Many instruction set, like x86, ARM, MIPS all provide conditional jump/branch instructions. Whether the jump will take place dependent on the condition specified in the instruction.

So compilers prefer this kind of instructions, and move the condition to the end of the loop to make use of the instruction.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.