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I'm new to c++ and wondering what "WM_KEYDOWN" is? And how to use it.

Thank you.

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1  
This is far too broad. Google around, do some research, get a good book on Windows GUI programming in C++ and come back with any specific problems you have. – Bojangles Mar 20 '12 at 0:58
    
Take a look at http://stackoverflow.com/a/2441480/884410 – Anurag Ranjhan Mar 20 '12 at 1:00
    
This site worked for me to start learning the Win32 API: winprog – chris Mar 20 '12 at 1:29
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If you're new to C++ you should maybe try something easier than Win32 api ... – Dinaiz Mar 20 '12 at 1:31
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I just saw that, you'll need a decent understanding of the language before you can begin to cope with it. – chris Mar 20 '12 at 1:33

A message flag produced by your window when your key is pressed. You can use it in the message handler function like

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);

Then register it to your WNDCLASS

WNDCLASS ws;
ws.lpfnWndProc = WndProc; 

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg153546(v=VS.85).aspx for more information about how to dual with WM_KEYDOWN in WndProc.

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WM_KEYDOWN is defined in the MSDN documentation:

#define WM_KEYDOWN  0x0100

While I don't have a better explanation than Microsoft's, I'll post what MSDN says:

Posted to the window with the keyboard focus when a nonsystem key is pressed. A nonsystem key is a key that is pressed when the Alt key is not pressed."

If you want the simple version, it is a value returned by Windows in a program when a key on the keyboard is pressed (and when Alt isn't). The opposite is WM_KEYUP, which will be emitted when you release the key.

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