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I have two files, wordlist.txt and text.txt.

The first file, wordlist.txt, contains a huge list of words in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, e.g.:

你
你们
我

The second file, text.txt, contains long passages, e.g.:

你们要去哪里?
卡拉OK好不好?

I want to create a new word list (wordsfount.txt), but it should only contain those lines from wordlist.txt which are found at least once within text.txt. The output file from the above should show this:

你
你们

"我" is not found in this list because it is never found in text.txt.

I want to find a very fast way to create this list which only contains lines from the first file that are found in the second.

I know a simple way in BASH to check each line in worlist.txt and see if it is in text.txt using grep:

a=1
while read line
do
    c=`grep -c $line text.txt`
    if [ "$c" -ge 1 ]
    then
    echo $line >> wordsfound.txt
    echo "Found" $a
fi
    echo "Not found" $a
    a=`expr $a + 1`
done < wordlist.txt

Unfortunately, as wordlist.txt is a very long list, this process takes many hours. There must be a faster solution. Here is one consideration:

As the files contain CJK letters, they can be thought of as a giant alphabet with about 8,000 letters. So nearly every word share characters. E.g.:

我
我们

Due to this fact, if "我" is never found within text.txt, then it is quite logical that "我们" never appears either. A faster script might perhaps check "我" first, and upon finding that it is not present, would avoid checking every subsequent word contained withing wordlist.txt that also contained within wordlist.txt. If there are about 8,000 unique characters found in wordlist.txt, then the script should not need to check so many lines.

What is the fastest way to create the list containing only those words that are in the first file that are also found somewhere within in the second?

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1  
Suppose is in wordlist.txt but 我们 isn't. Suppose that 我们 appears in text.txt is that a match for ? I.e. are you really matching words, or just arbitrary substrings of Chinese characters, which could be fragments of words? –  Kaz Mar 23 '12 at 23:50
    
My goal is to create a new, shortened wordlist.txt, which does not contain words which do not match, so that later, more complex scripts, which take many hours to do the work, can do their work much more quickly. The new list is about 5% of the original length. If "我们" is found, but “我" is never found in isolation, ideally, the new word list does not show "我", but if this additional check is very difficult to implement, then it is unnecessary. –  Village Mar 24 '12 at 0:45
1  
Not for nothin' Village, but you keep asking "is there a faster way"? The frank and honest truth is no, not really. There's no way faster than brute force to check for a value in an unsorted set, and there never will be. You can add a bunch of specific criterion to make use of binary searches, but the general case will never be faster than brute force. Sorry. Searches are an insanely consumptive process, and tons of research is being done into how to optimize them, but generally they involve ordering the data in some way. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Mar 29 '12 at 10:45
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13 Answers 13

I grabbed the text of War and Peace from the Gutenberg project and wrote the following script. If prints all words in /usr/share/dict/words which are also in war_and_peace.txt. You can change that with:

perl findwords.pl --wordlist=/path/to/wordlist --text=/path/to/text > wordsfound.txt

On my computer, it takes just over a second to run.

use strict;
use warnings;
use utf8::all;

use Getopt::Long;

my $wordlist = '/usr/share/dict/words';
my $text     = 'war_and_peace.txt';

GetOptions(
    "worlist=s" => \$wordlist,
    "text=s"    => \$text,
);

open my $text_fh, '<', $text
    or die "Cannot open '$text' for reading: $!";

my %is_in_text;
while ( my $line = <$text_fh> ) {
    chomp($line);

    # you will want to customize this line
    my @words = grep { $_ } split /[[:punct:][:space:]]/ => $line;
    next unless @words;

    # This beasty uses the 'x' builtin in list context to assign
    # the value of 1 to all keys (the words)
    @is_in_text{@words} = (1) x @words;
}

open my $wordlist_fh, '<', $wordlist
    or die "Cannot open '$wordlist' for reading: $!";

while ( my $word = <$wordlist_fh> ) {
    chomp($word);
    if ( $is_in_text{$word} ) {
        print "$word\n";
    }
}

And here's my timing:

• [ovid] $ wc -w war_and_peace.txt 
565450 war_and_peace.txt
• [ovid] $ time perl findwords.pl > wordsfound.txt 

real    0m1.081s
user    0m1.076s
sys 0m0.000s
• [ovid] $ wc -w wordsfound.txt 
15277 wordsfound.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
I should mention that for particularly huge text files, the File::Map (search.cpan.org/dist/File-Map) module is a good alternative, but it might be a bit trickier to use in this case. –  Ovid Mar 27 '12 at 8:54
1  
What is the purpose of the grep {$_} before split? –  Freek Kalter Mar 27 '12 at 19:27
1  
Freek: It's to grep out empty strings. You get a few of them with that split. –  Ovid Mar 27 '12 at 20:08
1  
This looks like it'll work for western languages but how will it cope with Chinese, Japanese and Korean, as this is what Village plans to use the code for. Remember, with a word list of A, AB and C, a text file containing ABDEFG would produce a results file with two lines; A and AB. Would this script produce this result? –  swampf0etus Mar 27 '12 at 21:32
1  
swampf0etus: the utf8::all line ensures that all filehandles (both in and out) are utf8, so reading other character sets will be fine. I have a note that the /[[:punct:][:space:]]/ regex will likely need to be changed depending on the user's needs. In short, this should be a reasonable solution, with a just a bit of tweaking. –  Ovid Mar 29 '12 at 12:53
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Just use comm

http://unstableme.blogspot.com/2009/08/linux-comm-command-brief-tutorial.html

comm -1 wordlist.txt text.txt

share|improve this answer
    
I made some test files, but it always prints every word contained in wordlist.txt, even if they never appear in text.txt. –  Village Mar 20 '12 at 4:54
1  
isn't it optimal for the inputs to comm to be sorted? comm -1 <(sort wordlist.txt) <(sort text.txt) for modern shells . Good luck to all. –  shellter Mar 25 '12 at 15:28
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This might work for you:

 tr '[:punct:]' ' ' < text.txt | tr -s ' ' '\n' |sort -u | grep -f - wordlist.txt

Basically, create a new word list from text.txt and grep it against wordlist.txt file.

N.B. You may want to use the software you used to build the original wordlist.txt. In which case all you need is:

yoursoftware < text.txt > newwordlist.txt
grep -f newwordlist.txt wordlist.txt 
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to assume that the words in text.txt are separated by spaces and that they use standard punctuation, but as everything is Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, there are no spaces between words and different punctuation symbols are used. –  Village Mar 20 '12 at 7:59
1  
Would setting the LC* variables have any affect on how this soution works? Good luck to all. –  shellter Mar 25 '12 at 1:24
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I would probably use Perl;

use strict;

my @aWordList = ();

open(WORDLIST, "< wordlist.txt") || die("Can't open wordlist.txt);

while(my $sWord = <WORDLIST>)
{
   chomp($sWord);
   push(@aWordList, $sWord);
}

close(WORDLIST);

open(TEXT, "< text.txt") || die("Can't open text.txt);

while(my $sText = <TEXT>)
{
   foreach my $sWord (@aWordList)
   {
      if($sText =~ /$sWord/)
      {
          print("$sWord\n");
      }
   }
}


close(TEXT);

This won't be too slow, but if you could let us know the size of the files you're dealing with I could have a go at writing something much more clever with hash tables

share|improve this answer
    
The wordlist.txt file can contain nearly 300,000 lines. The text.txt files vary in length, from very short, to millions of characters. –  Village Mar 24 '12 at 0:31
1  
This takes an age when run against war_and_peace and the unix dictionary. I'm currently working on a faster hash table version. –  swampf0etus Mar 26 '12 at 16:26
add comment

Quite sure not the fastest solution, but at least a working one (I hope).

This solution needs ruby 1.9, the text file are expected to be UTF-8.

#encoding: utf-8
#Get test data
$wordlist = File.readlines('wordlist.txt', :encoding => 'utf-8').map{|x| x.strip}
$txt = File.read('text.txt', :encoding => 'utf-8')

new_wordlist = []
$wordlist.each{|word|
  new_wordlist << word if $txt.include?(word)
}

#Save the result
File.open('wordlist_new.txt', 'w:utf-8'){|f|
  f << new_wordlist.join("\n")
}

Can you provide a bigger example to make some benchmark on different methods? (Perhaps some test files to download?)

Below a benchmark with four methods.

#encoding: utf-8
require 'benchmark'
N = 10_000 #Number of Test loops

#Get test data
$wordlist = File.readlines('wordlist.txt', :encoding => 'utf-8').map{|x| x.strip}
$txt = File.read('text.txt', :encoding => 'utf-8')

def solution_count
    new_wordlist = []
    $wordlist.each{|word|
      new_wordlist << word if $txt.count(word) > 0
    }
    new_wordlist.sort
end

#Faster then count, it can stop after the first hit
def solution_include
    new_wordlist = []
    $wordlist.each{|word|
      new_wordlist << word if $txt.include?(word)
    }
    new_wordlist.sort
end
def solution_combine()
    #get biggest word size
    max = 0
    $wordlist.each{|word| max = word.size if word.size > max }
    #Build list of all letter combination from text
    words_in_txt = []
    0.upto($txt.size){|i|
      1.upto(max){|l|
        words_in_txt << $txt[i,l]
      }
    }
    (words_in_txt & $wordlist).sort
end
#Idea behind:
#- remove string if found.
#- the next comparison is faster, the search text is shorter.
#
#This will not work with overlapping words.
#Example:
#  abcdef contains def.
#  if we check bcd first, the 'd' of def will be deleted, def is not detected.
def solution_gsub
    new_wordlist = []
    txt = $txt.dup  #avoid to manipulate data source for other methods
    #We must start with the big words.
    #If we start with small one, we destroy  long words
    $wordlist.sort_by{|x| x.size }.reverse.each{|word|
      new_wordlist << word if txt.gsub!(word,'')
    }
    #Now we must add words which where already part of longer words
    new_wordlist.dup.each{|neww|
      $wordlist.each{|word|          
        new_wordlist << word if word != neww and neww.include?(word)
      }
    }
    new_wordlist.sort
end

#Save the result
File.open('wordlist_new.txt', 'w:utf-8'){|f|
  #~ f << solution_include.join("\n")
  f << solution_combine.join("\n")
}

#Check the different results
if solution_count != solution_include
  puts "Difference solution_count <> solution_include"
end
if solution_gsub != solution_include
  puts "Difference solution_gsub <> solution_include"
end
if solution_combine != solution_include
  puts "Difference solution_combine <> solution_include"
end

#Benchmark the solution
Benchmark.bmbm(10) {|b|

  b.report('count') { N.times { solution_count } }
  b.report('include') { N.times { solution_include } }
  b.report('gsub') { N.times { solution_gsub } } #wrong results
  b.report('combine') { N.times { solution_gsub } } #wrong results

} #Benchmark

I think, the solution_gsub variant is not correct. See the comment in the method definition. If CJK may allow this solution, the please give me a feedback. That variant is the slowest in my test, but perhaps it will tune up with bigger examples. And perhaps it can be tuned a bit.

The variant combine is also very slow, but it would be interestiung what happens with a bigger example.

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First TXR solution ( http://www.nongnu.org/txr ):

@(next :args)
@wordfile
@textfile
@(do
  (defvar tg-hash (hash :equal-based)) ;; tg == "trigraph"

  (defun lazy-line-list (file)
    (let ((stream (open-file file "r")))
      (let (line) (gen (set line (get-line stream)) line))))

  (mapcar (lambda (line)
            (for ((i 0)) ((< i (length line))) ((inc i))
              (push line [tg-hash [line i..(+ i 1)]])
              (push line [tg-hash [line i..(+ i 2)]])
              (push line [tg-hash [line i..(+ i 3)]])))
          (lazy-line-list textfile))

  (mapcar (lambda (word)
            (if (< (length word) 4)
              (if [tg-hash word]
                (put-line word))
              (if (find [tg-hash [word 0..3]] word
                        (op search-str @2 @1 0))
                (put-line word))))
          (lazy-line-list wordfile))
  (put-string ""))

The strategy here is to reduce the corpus of words to a hash table which is indexed on individual characters, digraphs and trigraphs occuring in the lines, associating these fragments with the lines. Then when we process the word list, this reduces the search effort.

Firstly if the word is short, three characters or less (probably common in Chinese words), we can try to get an instant match in the hash table. If no match, word is not in the corpus.

If the word is longer than three characters, we can try to get a match for the first three characters. That gives us a list of lines which contain a match for the trigraph. We can search those lines exhaustively to see which ones of them match the word. I suspect that this will greatly reduce the number of lines that have to be searched.

I would need your data, or something representative thereof, to be able to see what the behavior is like.

Sample run:

$ txr words.txr words.txt text.txt
water
fire
earth
the

$ cat words.txt
water
fire
earth
the
it

$ cat text.txt
Long ago people
believed that the four
elements were
just
water
fire
earth

(TXR reads UTF-8 and does all string manipulation in Unicode, so testing with ASCII characters is valid.)

The use of lazy lists means that we do not store the entire list of 300,000 words, for instance. Although we are using the Lisp mapcar function, the list is being generated on the fly and because we don't keep the reference to the head of the list, it is eligible for garbage collection.

Unfortunately we do have to keep the text corpus in memory because the hash table associates lines.

If that's a problem, the solution could be reversed. Scan all the words, and then process the text corpus lazily, tagging those words which occur. Then eliminate the rest. I will post such a solution also.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the bounty; identifying and fixing that that silly garbage collector behavior was really all the reward I needed out of this. –  Kaz Mar 30 '12 at 21:57
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Second TXR solution ( http://www.nongnu.org/txr )

@(next :args)
@wordfile
@textfile
@(do 
  (defvar trigraph-to-words (hash :equal-based))
  (defvar digraphs (hash :equal-based))
  (defvar unigraphs (hash :equal-based))
  (defvar word-occurs (hash :equal-based))

  (defun lazy-line-list (file)
    (let ((stream (open-file file "r")))
      (let (line) (gen (set line (get-line stream)) line))))

  (defun get-trigraphs (str)
    (mappend (lambda (i)
               (list [str i..(+ i 3)]))
             (range 0 (- (length str) 3))))

  (defun get-digraphs (str)
    (mappend (lambda (i)
               (list [str i..(+ i 2)]))
             (range 0 (- (length str) 2))))

  (each ((word (lazy-line-list wordfile)))
    (cond
     ((> (length word) 3)
      (push word  [trigraph-to-words [word 0..3]]))
     ((eql (length word) 3)
      (push word [trigraph-to-words word]))
     ((eql (length word) 2)
      (set [digraphs word] t))
     (t (set [unigraphs word] t))))

  (each ((line (lazy-line-list textfile)))
    ;; If the short-words hashes have no entries
    ;; replace them with nil, so we do not bother
    ;; considering those words any more.
    (if (and digraphs (zerop (hash-count digraphs)))
      (set digraphs nil))
    (if (and unigraphs (zerop (hash-count unigraphs)))
      (set unigraphs nil))

    ;; Find all trigraphs in this line, and
    ;; for each trigraph, find words which
    ;; contain that trigraph. Those words may 
    ;; occur in this line, which can be double
    ;; checked by a substring search.
    (if (>= (length line) 3)
      (each ((tg (get-trigraphs line)))
        (each ((word [trigraph-to-words tg])) 
          (if (not [word-occurs word])
            (if (search-str line word 0)
              (progn
                (set [word-occurs word] t)))))))

    ;; If there remain digraphs words in the dictionary
    ;; that have not occurred, then break the line
    ;; into digraphs, and see if any of
    ;; those digraphs occur.
    (if (and digraphs (>= (length line) 2))
      (each ((dg (get-digraphs line)))
        (if [digraphs dg]
          (progn (set [word-occurs dg] t)
                 (del [digraphs dg])))))

    ;; Finally, for each line, check individual
    ;; characters against the unigraph list
    (if unigraphs
      (each ((letter (split-str line "")))
        (if [unigraphs letter]
          (progn (set [word-occurs letter] t)
                 (del [unigraphs letter]))))))

  (dohash (word occurs word-occurs)
    (put-line word))

  (put-string ""))

I ran this on a Core 2 Duo Laptop (P8400, 2.26GHz), where VirtualBox is running Ubuntu over Windows. The test case is the /usr/share/dict/words file containing over 90,000 entries, versus the complete text of the English Translation of Tolstoy's War and Peace pulled from Project Gutenberg (about 3.3 megabytes).

The virtual memory fooprint quickly climbed to 10700 bytes as the word dictionary was read, and then stayed flat while scanning the text. The only system calls I observed with strace during the remainder of the hour were 4096 byte reads of the text.

Results:

$ time txr words2.txr /usr/share/dict/words /tmp/tolstoy-war-and-peace-gutenberg-2600.txt > war-and-peace-words.txt
real  66m49.914s
user  65m15.277s
sys   0m49.043s

$ head war-and-peace-words.txt 
concourse
pursuits
recruits
appreciated
unappreciated
perceive
cobblestone
commiserating
build
mild

$ tail war-and-peace-words.txt 
curiously
populated
appraise
essayist
disguised
disguise
championship
approaches
mosquito
lorgnette

$ wc /tmp/tolstoy-war-and-peace-gutenberg-2600.txt 
  65336  565454 3288739 /tmp/tolstoy-war-and-peace-gutenberg-2600.txt
$ wc /usr/share/dict/words
 98569  98568 931708 /usr/share/dict/words
$ wc war-and-peace-words.txt 
 19344  19344 158153 war-and-peace-words.txt

With the following change, which requires the latest TXR from git, the running time drops to 11 minutes and 6 seconds. The newly exposed function got it down to 21 minutes, and then a small fix for a silly behavior in the garbage collector improved it further:

    ;; Find all trigraphs in this line, and
    ;; for each trigraph, find words which
    ;; contain that trigraph. Those words may 
    ;; occur in this line, which can be double
    ;; checked by a substring search.
    (if (>= (length line) 3)
      (each ((tg (get-trigraphs line))
             (pos (range 0)))
        (let* ((words [trigraph-to-words tg])
               (len (match-str-tree line words pos))
               (word (if len [line pos..(+ pos len)])))
          (if (and word (not [word-occurs word]))
            (set [word-occurs word] t)))))

real  11m6.787s
user  10m44.356s
sys   0m9.893s
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this implements a "maximal munch". At a given position, if two or more words could match, the longest one is considered the word. –  Kaz Mar 27 '12 at 5:18
    
Got that time down to 9m21.952s by experimentally changing the mark and sweep garbage collector to generational gc. That is an initial result, without any tuning. –  Kaz Apr 4 '12 at 0:44
    
Got it down to 7:50 with some tuning of the new generational GC parameters in TXR. –  Kaz Apr 4 '12 at 2:00
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new file newlist.txt
for each word in wordlist.txt:
    check if word is in text.txt (I would use grep, if you're willing to use bash)
    if yes:
        append it to newlist.txt (probably echo word >> newlist.txt)
    if no:
        next word
share|improve this answer
    
Can this be made faster by considering the fact mentioned above that many characters appear multiple times in wordlist.txt? –  Village Mar 20 '12 at 4:55
1  
You could use the -L option in grep, which short circuits and closes after the first match. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Mar 22 '12 at 0:06
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Simplest way with bash script:

  1. Preprocessing first with "tr" and "sort" to format it to one word a line and remove duplicated lines.

  2. Do this:

cat wordlist.txt | while read i; do grep -E "^$i$" text.txt; done;

That's the list of words you want...

share|improve this answer
    
This is simple, but still takes a long time. Is there a faster way? –  Village Mar 20 '12 at 4:55
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Use grep with fixed-strings (-F) semantics, this will be fastest. Similarly, if you want to write it in Perl, use the index function instead of regex.

sort -u wordlist.txt > wordlist-unique.txt
grep -F -f wordlist-unique.txt text.txt

I'm surprised that there are already four answers, but no one posted this yet. People just don't know their toolbox anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
This finds and prints those lines in text.txt that have words in wordlist.txt, however, I want to print only those lines in wordlist.txt which have a match somewhere in text.txt. –  Village Mar 22 '12 at 23:49
1  
@Village I guess you could add a -o to grep (display only the matching parts) and make that unique again with sort -u. –  Michael Kohl Mar 24 '12 at 8:39
1  
@daxim: This won't work in the general case. For example, if your word list contains foo and foobar, and the text contains foobar, this will only return foobar. Of course, another search with the matches in the word list could detect such substring matches. –  l0b0 Mar 26 '12 at 9:17
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Try this: cat wordlist.txt | while read line do if [[ grep -wc $line text.txt -gt 0 ]] then echo $line fi done

Whatever you do, if you use grep you must use -w to match a whole word. Otherwise if you have foo in wordlist.txt and foobar in text.txt, you'll get wrong match.

If the files are VERY big, and this loop takes too much time to run, you can convert text.txt to a list of work (easy with AWK), and use comm to find the words that are in both lists.

share|improve this answer
1  
-w won't work with chinese words... so you have to use regex in this case to make sure each line is matched. –  Spike Mar 20 '12 at 17:07
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This solution is in perl, maintains your original symantics and uses the optimization you suggested.

#!/usr/bin/perl
@list=split("\n",`sort < ./wordlist.txt | uniq`);
$size=scalar(@list);
for ($i=0;$i<$size;++$i) { $list[$i]=quotemeta($list[$i]);}
for ($i=0;$i<$size;++$i) {
    my $j = $i+1;
    while ($list[$j]=~/^$list[$i]/) {
            ++$j;
    }
    $skip[$i]=($j-$i-1);
}
open IN,"<./text.txt" || die;
@text = (<IN>);
close IN;
foreach $c(@text) {
    for ($i=0;$i<$size;++$i) {
            if ($c=~/$list[$i]/) {
                    $found{$list[$i]}=1;
                    last;
            }
            else {
                    $i+=$skip[$i];
            }
    }
}
open OUT,">wordsfound.txt" ||die;
while ( my ($key, $value) = each(%found) ) {
        print OUT "$key\n";
}
close OUT;
exit;
share|improve this answer
1  
This is similar to the method I provided, but I don't see any benefit in adding the results to a hash to be iterated and printed at the end. You're spending time (and memory) adding to the hash and then iterating and printing the hash contents when you could just print each result as it's found. Also, you're slurping entire files into arrays. As these files are potentially quite large, so this could blow the memory. –  swampf0etus Mar 25 '12 at 7:49
1  
I take the requirement is for the result to be shown only once, hence the hash. I tested with a 200k wordlist.txt file, only takes a few seconds to do. Now the poster said wordlist.txt is huge, but text.txt varies. Since the wordlist.txt is sorted, some optimization can be one as the poster suggested. –  pizza Mar 25 '12 at 8:16
1  
I meant 2000k not 200k, based on the assumption wordlist.txt is said to be about 300k lines, CJK words are typically 1-3 characters in length, assuming all words are 3 characters + lineend (8 bytes per line). The memory requirement is about a few megabytes. The optimization is realistic as there are a fairly large number of words start with the same character or some subset of characters. –  pizza Mar 25 '12 at 8:26
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Use paralel processing to speed up the processing.

1) sort & uniq on wordlist.txt, then split it to several files (X) Do some testing, X is equal with your computer cores.

 split -d -l wordlist.txt

2) use xargs -p X -n 1 script.sh x00 > output-x00.txt to process the files in paralel

 find ./splitted_files_dir -type f -name "x*" -print| xargs -p 20 -n 1 -I SPLITTED_FILE script.sh SPLITTED_FILE

3) cat output* > output.txt concatenate output files

This will speed up the processing enough, and you are able to use tools that you could understand. This will ease up the maintinging "cost".

The script almost identical that you used in the first place.

script.sh
FILE=$1
OUTPUTFILE="output-${FILE}.txt"
WORDLIST="wordliist.txt"
a=1
while read line
do
    c=`grep -c $line ${FILE} `
    if [ "$c" -ge 1 ]
    then
    echo $line >> ${OUTPUTFILE}
    echo "Found" $a
fi
    echo "Not found" $a
    a=`expr $a + 1`
done < ${WORDLIST}
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1  
This will be uselessly slow on even moderately sized word lists. For each line of the huge corpus of text, you want to grep through the huge wordlist. Also, you're doing the grep the wrong way: you're seeing whether a whole line of text (consisting of many words) occurs in the list of words. –  Kaz Mar 27 '12 at 5:21
1  
In the specification, the wordlist contain one word per line. The linux kernel will cache the text file, so it will be quite fast. Yes, I replaced the wordlist/textlist files, I will edit the script. This method can be used with any other scripts, I use shell script here because the requestor seems to understand shell scripts well. –  user1126070 Mar 27 '12 at 6:48
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