Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been reading some binary search algorithms I found on the internet, and I noticed this block of code within all examples I have encountered.

if (query > contents[midIndex])
{
    minIndex = midIndex + 1;
}
else if (query < contents[midIndex])
{
    maxIndex = midIndex - 1;
}

Why is that though? I tried doing this:

if (query > contents[midIndex])
{
    minIndex = midIndex;
    midIndex = (minIndex + maxIndex) / 2;
}
else if (query < contents[midIndex])
{
    maxIndex = midIndex;
    midIndex = (minIndex + maxIndex) / 2;
}

That code works in all the testing I've done, and isn't it faster? If it isn't faster, can someone explain the logic of the first snippet of code?

share|improve this question
2  
I expect you're doing the same thing as the examples (except you aren't eliminating the value at midIndex as you should be, hence their +- 1). Look for more code where the midIndex gets re-calculated for the next loop. –  Collin Green Mar 20 '12 at 3:09
    
Why would you expect it to be faster? –  svick Mar 20 '12 at 3:11
    
sorry, misconception on my part. –  No_name Mar 20 '12 at 3:27
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, all I can say is that, the first part is NOT binary search at all. (+ it doesn't even seem to recalculate the midIndex variable)

The purpose of binary searches is to be "focusing" the searches in "halves" of the total range until the spectrum has been narrowed down to the element we've been looking for...

share|improve this answer
    
    
Nope; but you just forgot to mention the int imid = (imin + imax) / 2; part (I'm referring to the Wikipedia article) in the initial code you posted... it makes quite a difference, huh? –  Dr.Kameleon Mar 20 '12 at 3:16
    
even then, isn't the +-1 unnecessary? –  No_name Mar 20 '12 at 3:20
    
Nope, it's not. And here's why : let's say you start with the range (0..10). Is our test_element > element[5]? If yes then search to the "higher range"... but which one is that? (5..10)? or (6..10)? In a few words, there is no point in "rechecking" element[5], since we already know it's NOT the one we were looking for... (test_element was GREATER than element[5] right?) That's what we would do, even if it was LESS than... search in (0..4), and NOT in (0..5)... ;-) –  Dr.Kameleon Mar 20 '12 at 3:24
    
yet another question, why are most of the conditions on the while loop (imax >= imin)? is the equal sign necessary? –  No_name Mar 20 '12 at 3:28
show 1 more comment
 You can achieve binary search by loop or recursion and there are so many code 

in the Internet.The principle of the binary search is like search one page in a book.The pages is orderd and you will look for one half every time.This is the principle of your first snippet of code.

 About the speed of the two segments,I think they are not whole.Binary search is 

not so easy and there are some details should be noticed.Please google for it!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.