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I am looking for a bash script that reads a log and replaces IP addresses with a hostname. Does anyone have any idea of how to do this?

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2  
What have you tried, and where are you stuck? –  Michael Petrotta Mar 20 '12 at 3:44
4  
I tried posting on Stack Overflow, and I'm stuck waiting for answers. –  Kaz Mar 20 '12 at 4:19
    
IPv4 or IPv6 or both? Do you have the hostnames in /etc/hosts? –  user unknown Mar 20 '12 at 5:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Following script should work. You can use it like this:

save it to ip_to_hostname.sh and then:

./ip_to_hostname.sh your_logfile > resolved_ip

#!/bin/bash

logFile=$1

while read line
do
        for word in $line
        do
                # if word is ip address change to hostname
                if [[ $word =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$ ]]
                then
                        # check if ip address is correct
                        OIFS=$IFS
                        IFS="."
                        ip=($word)
                        IFS=$OIFS
                        if [[ ${ip[0]} -le 255 && ${ip[1]} -le 255 && ${ip[2]} -le 255 && ${ip[3]} -le 255 ]]
                        then
                                echo -n `host $word | cut -d' ' -f 5`
                                echo -n " "
                        else
                                echo -n "$word"
                                echo -n " "
                        fi
                # else print word
                else
                        echo -n $word
                        echo -n " "
                fi
        done
        # new line
        echo
done < "$logFile"
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This script worked very well. In hindsight, I should have described the format of my log better. (It's from a Netgear router) I made some slight modifications, and this works like a charm, thank you! –  zkxs Mar 20 '12 at 20:44

The resolving can be done like this:

ip=72.30.38.140
hostname=nslookup $ip | grep name
hostname=${hostname#*name = }
hostname=${hostname%.}

This way IPs do not have to be in /etc/hosts.

The script itself depends on how your log looks like. Can you post an example?

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Beware of common mistake when using sed for substitutions. Think what happens if you have IPs 72.30.38.140 and 72.30.38.14. When you replace 72.30.38.14 it will be replaced in 72.30.38.140 also because it contains 72.30.38.14. You must replace with the IP fieled seperators. –  Eran Ben-Natan Mar 20 '12 at 7:52

Talking about IPv4: You may generate a list of sed-commands from your hosts file:

sed -rn 's/^(([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}([0-9]{1,3}))[ \t]([^ \t]+)[ \t].*/s#\1#\4#/p' /etc/hosts > hosts.sed 

Then apply it on your logfile:

sed -f hosts.sed LOGFILE

Of course your hostsfilenames have to be listed in the hostfile.

Another, inverse approach would be to use logresolve.

From the manpage:

NAME
   logresolve - Resolve IP-addresses to hostnames in Apache log files

SYNOPSIS
   logresolve [ -s filename ] [ -c ] < access_log > access_log.new

SUMMARY
   logresolve is a post-processing program to resolve IP-addresses in Apache's access logfiles. To minimize
   impact on your nameserver, logresolve has its very own internal hash-table cache. This means  that  each
   IP number will only be looked up the first time it is found in the log file.

   Takes  an  Apache  log file on standard input. The IP addresses must be the first thing on each line and
   must be separated from the remainder of the line by a space.

So you could use REGEX's to extract all IPs, put them 2 times into a new file, once into the first column, and convert it with logresolve. Then use this table for generating such a sedfile as above.

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This is the modified version of wisent's script I ended up using:

#!/bin/bash

logFile=$1

while read line
do
       for word in $line
       do
               # if word is ip address change to hostname
               if [[ $word =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\:[0-9]{1,5}$ ]]
               then
                       port=$(echo "$word" | sed -e "s/.*://")
                       word=$(echo "$word" | sed -e "s/:.*//")
                       OIFS=$IFS
                       IFS="."
                       ip=($word)
                       IFS=$OIFS
                       # check if ip address is correct and not 192.168.*
                       if [[ ${ip[0]} -le 255 && ${ip[1]} -le 255 && ${ip[2]} -le 255 && ${ip[3]} -le 255 && ${ip[0]}${ip[1]} -ne 192168 ]]
                       then
                               host=$(host $word | cut -d' ' -f 5)
                               if [[ $host =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\(.*\)$ ]] # check for resolver errors
                               then
                                       # if the resolver failed
                                       echo -n "$word"
                                       echo -n ":$port"
                                       echo -n " "
                               else
                                       # if the resolver worked
                                       host=$(echo "$host'" | sed -e "s/\.'//" | sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/.*\n//g') # clean up cut's output
                                       echo -n "$host"
                                       echo -n ":$port"
                                       echo -n " "
                               fi
                       else
                               # if the ip address isn't correct
                               echo -n "$word"
                               echo -n ":$port"
                               echo -n " "
                       fi
               # else print word
               else
                       echo -n $word
                       echo -n " "
               fi
       done
       # new line
       echo
done < "$logFile"
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I added this to my .bashrc some time ago...

function resolve-hostname-from-ip()
{
    if [ ! $1 ]
    then 
        echo -e "${red}Please provide an ip address...${no_color}"
        return 1
    fi
    echo "" | traceroute $1|grep " 1 "|cut -d ' ' -f4|cut -d '.' -f1
}

I have pre-defined terminal colors, so you can omit those if you like. =D

[root@somehostname ~ 08:50 AM] $ resolve-hostname-from-ip 111.22.33.444
someotherhostname

I have tested this on RHEL and SUSE successfully. I haven't tested it on IP's outside of my domain though, so I'm not 100% sure it will work in all cases...hope this helps =)

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