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In Swing, I create SwingWorkers or use invokeLater to do time intensive computations without perturbing Swings GUI thread. How does one do this in SWT? I'm writing code using a Callable and a Future, but I don't think this will cut it :

class MyClass extends ViewPart { 

    .
    .
    .
    @Override
    public void createPartControl(final Composite arg0) {
        this.runScenarioItem.addSelectionListener(new SelectionAdapter() {
                @Override
                public void widgetSelected(final SelectionEvent e) {                
                    final ScenarioDialog scenarioDialog = new ScenarioDialog(arg0.getShell(), SWT.DIALOG_TRIM
                            | SWT.APPLICATION_MODAL);
                    final Scenario scenario = scenarioDialog.open();
                    if (suvConnection.isConnected()) {
                        runScenarioItem.setEnabled(false);
                        try {
                            final ScenarioRunner runner = new ScenarioRunner(suvConnection, scenario);
                            final ExecutorService executor = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(1);
                            final Future<Integer> future = executor.submit(runner);
                            System.out.println("result of callable = " + future.get());
                            runScenarioItem.setEnabled(true);

                        }
                        catch (final Exception e1) {
                            e1.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
            });
    }
}

EDIT:

I'm trying to add the following snippet into my intensive computation class:

            final Display display = this.shell.getDisplay();
            display.asyncExec(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    if (!display.isDisposed()) {
                        display.readAndDispatch();
                    }
                }
            });

I will update when I have more information. Man I miss Swing...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you should avoid subjective impressions in your question, they don't help to answer a question, second for a snippet how to access widgets from another thread see here, why this is is neccessary see here and if you use SWT in combination with the Eclipse RCP Framework you should consider to handle long running processes in Eclipse Jobs.

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Thanks Tom. Sorry for the unhelpful ranting :) –  Amir Afghani Mar 20 '12 at 17:34
    
Please copy the relevant parts into your answer as all the sites on the web come and go. –  Shiki Jan 17 '14 at 10:46

You want to call asyncExec on Display. Please read the SWT Threading Issues doc for more details.

Here's the relevant sample code snippet from that doc, which shows how to use it to redraw a window:

// do time-intensive computations
...
// now update the UI. We don't depend on the result,
// so use async.
display.asyncExec (new Runnable () {
   public void run () {
      if (!myWindow.isDisposed())
         myWindow.redraw ();
   }
});
// now do more computations
...
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I saw that documentation and I still don't understand. Are you saying that I update the display inside of my number crunching code? SWT really is trash. –  Amir Afghani Mar 20 '12 at 4:54
1  
Display.asyncExec is roughly equivalent to SwingUtilities.invokeLater. You pass Runnables to both. Both will take that Runnable and then schedule it on the main UI thread. Since both are asynchronous, the UI updates do not happen immediately, but when it is alright to do so. –  louielouie Mar 20 '12 at 4:58
1  
Can you post a working snippet? Won't running this code starve the UI thread? –  Amir Afghani Mar 20 '12 at 5:01

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