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I have created an applet which has a necessity to execute the following code:

Code

public class Example extends JApplet {
private ServerSocket ss ;
private Socket socket;
private boolean closed;

@Override
public void init(){
    try {
        new Example().initialize();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Example.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null,ex);
    }
}
public void closed(){
    System.out.println("Inside close");
    this.closed=true;
  }
public void initialize() throws IOException{
    ss =new ServerSocket(5002);
    while(!closed){
    System.out.println("Waiting to accept request");
    socket = ss.accept();
    System.out.println("Request accepted");
    } 
}}

HTML

Fragment of HTML file to execute applet:

<script type="text/javascript" >  
 function closeCall(){  
 document.app.closed();  
 }  
 </script>  
   <body>  
<applet id="app" code="example.Example" archive="Example.jar" height="300" width="300">    
   </applet>  
   <input type="button" value="go" onClick="closeCall()" />  

Problem: On clicking Go my browser stops responding and there is no error in javascript code as well. Is there any way to call the document.app.closed(); method?

share|improve this question
    
If by 'close' you mean you want it to disappear from the page, give it an ID, and use the JS to set the 'visibility' of that ID to 'none' (check the stuff in inverted commas in a CSS reference - I have not had my coffee yet). Do NOT try to end the VM! –  Andrew Thompson Mar 20 '12 at 6:53
    
I only just noticed the sockets tag. Do you mean close the socket? –  Andrew Thompson Mar 20 '12 at 6:56
1  
As an aside, a standard applet does not have a close() method. What exactly does yours do? What output is in the Java Console and JavaScript error reporting component? Do you have an URL where we can see the applet live? –  Andrew Thompson Mar 20 '12 at 6:58
    
@AndrewThompson No there is not hiding trouble and neither I want to close socket.I want to call the close method in java from javascript and when I call it my browser stops responding.And I am sorry I dont have an URL where you can see the applet live. –  xyz Mar 20 '12 at 7:57
    
while(true){ should probably read while(!closed){. For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. Do you see Inside close in the Java Console? –  Andrew Thompson Mar 20 '12 at 8:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It was only after turning that code into an SSCCE1 that the many problems became clear:

  • This code failed for me without any sign of JS. That indicates to me that this has nothing to do with JS!
  • The instance of Example on which initialize() was called was not the same as that which was the applet! It did not matter if the UI ever detected the JS, it would not have stopped the running instance.
  • The accept() was blocking the EDT.
  • Setting closed to true was not about to have an effect until after the next client connected and the code looped around to check the value of the closed attribute again. I achieved it by calling ss.close() (which makes the closed attribute redundant BTW - but I left it in).

BTW

  1. Please consider posting an SSCCE in future.

Code

Try this version:

// <applet code='Example' width=400 height=100></applet>
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;
import java.util.logging.*;

public class Example extends JApplet {
    private ServerSocket ss ;
    private Socket socket;
    private boolean closed;

    @Override
    public void init(){
        JButton stop = new JButton("Stop!");
        stop.addActionListener( new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
                closed();
            }
        });
        add( stop );
        validate();

        Runnable r = new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    initialize();
                } catch (IOException ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        };
        Thread t = new Thread(r);
        t.start();
    }

    public void closed() {
        System.out.println("Inside close");
        closed=true;
        try {
            ss.close();
        } catch(Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void initialize() throws IOException {
        ss =new ServerSocket(5002);
        while(!closed){
            System.out.println("Waiting to accept request");
            socket = ss.accept();
            System.out.println("Request accepted");
        }
    }
}

Run

I have added a button to this version so that you can check it works as expected without JavaScript (which you should have checked with your own code before tossing JS into the mix). The single line comment at the top of the source is used by AppletVewer to put the code on-screen. Use it like this:

prompt> appletviewer Example.java

Typical Output

Waiting to accept request
Inside close
java.net.SocketException: socket closed
    at java.net.PlainSocketImpl.socketAccept(Native Method)
    at java.net.PlainSocketImpl.accept(PlainSocketImpl.java:408)
    at java.net.ServerSocket.implAccept(ServerSocket.java:462)
    at java.net.ServerSocket.accept(ServerSocket.java:430)
    at Example.initialize(Example.java:51)
    at Example$2.run(Example.java:27)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

Tool completed successfully
share|improve this answer

I don't believe that the applet security sandbox allows you to invoke a System#exit(). Even when it did, it would be bad for user experience as the enduser wouldn't be able to run it again without reopening the page in browser.

Rather let that while intercept on a boolean instance variable which you toggle in the close() method. E.g.

private boolean closed;

public void initialize() {
    while (!closed) {
        // ...
    }
}

public void close() {
    this.closed = true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried your code as well but I guess socket = ss.accept(); line stops me to close or even to exit.Is there any solution? –  xyz Mar 20 '12 at 5:55
    
Just set a timeout on socket connection and/or call close() on the socket. –  BalusC Mar 20 '12 at 6:00

try this from pastebin.com and kill-java-applet-via-javascript

<script>
 document.MyApplet.killApplet();
 </script>


 public void killApplet()
 {
    AccessController.doPrivileged(new PrivilegedAction()
   {

        public Void run() {
            // kill the JVM
            System.exit(0);
            return null;
        }
    });
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Killing the JVM is utterly irresponsible. I'd be surprised if it worked in any current VM. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 20 '12 at 6:50

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