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As the title says, I have to trim a binary tree based on a given min and max value. Each node stores a value, and a left/right node. I may define private helper methods to solve this problem, but otherwise I may not call any other methods of the class nor create any data structures such as arrays, lists, etc.

An example would look like this:

                           overallRoot
                         _____[50]____________________
                        /                             \
          __________[38]                _______________[90]
         /              \              /
    _[14]                [42]      [54]_____
   /     \                                  \
[8]       [20]                               [72]
          \                             /    \
               [26]                     [61]      [83]

trim(52, 65);

should return:

overallRoot
[54]
    \
     [61]

My attempted solution has three methods:

public void trim(int min, int max) {
rootFinder(overallRoot, min, max);

}

First recursive method finds the new root perfectly.

private void rootFinder(IntTreeNode node, int min, int max) {
if (node == null)
    return;

if (overallRoot.data < min) {
    node = overallRoot = node.right;
    rootFinder(node, min, max);

}

else if (overallRoot.data > max) {
    node = overallRoot = node.left;
    rootFinder(node, min, max);
}
else
    cutter(overallRoot, min, max);
}

This second method should eliminate any further nodes not within the min/max, but it doesn't work as I would hope.

private void cutter(IntTreeNode node, int min, int max) {
if (node == null)
    return;

if (node.data <= min) {
    node.left = null;
}
if (node.data >= max) {
    node.right = null;
}

if (node.data < min) {
    node = node.right;
}

if (node.data > max) {
    node = node.left;
}


cutter(node.left, min, max);
cutter(node.right, min, max);
}

This returns:

overallRoot
[54]_____
         \
          [72]
         /
     [61]

Any help is appreciated. Feel free to ask for further explanation as needed.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a binary search tree! – Vikrant Goel May 7 '15 at 21:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This assumes that a node x has the following values:

  1. left (pointer to the left child)
  2. right (pointer to the right child)
  3. parent (pointer to parent)

You might want to make a method called CutBranch, which should simply remove a node an all it's subtrees from your tree. Let T be your tree, and let T.root be a pointer to it's root. It could then work like this:

CutBranch(x,T) {
    y = T.root;
    while (y.left != x && y.right != x) {
        if (y < x) y = y.right;
        else       y = y.left;
        }
    if (y < x) y.right = Nil;
    else       y.left = Nil;
}

This assumes that your tree doesn't include nodes with equal values of course, but it takes O(lg n) time. It doesn't do any garbage collection however.

now you can iterate through the nodes, and every time you reach a node smaller than your lower bound, you can call CutBranch on it's left child, and then delete the node itself. If the node is larger than your upper bound, then you can CutBranch it's right child and delete it.

share|improve this answer

Great question, thumbs up, although I think if you consider a different approach it gets easier. Like, for every node, first "TRIM" the children, and then "TRIM" itself.

  1. The following method assumes the tree is a BST as per the example in your question.

    public Node trim(Node root, int min, int max){
        if(root==null)
            return root;
        root.rightChild = trim (root.rightChild, min, max);
        root.leftChild = trim (root.leftChild,min,max);
    
        if(root.key>max || root.key<min){
            if(root.rightChild!=null)
                return root.rightChild;
            return root.leftChild;
        }
        return root;
    }
    
  2. Although, if you want it to work for any Binary Tree, weather BST or not. Just make the following changes to the if statement above.

    if(root.key>max || root.key<min){
        if(root.rightChild==null)
            return root.leftChild;
        else if(root.leftChild==null)
            return root.rightChild;
        else{
            //randomly select one of the children to be parent and add the other child to the first free space in its sub tree
            //This is based on personal preferences
            Node temp = root.leftChild;
            while(temp.leftChild!=null || temp.rightChild!=null){
                temp = temp.leftChild;
            }
            if(temp.leftChild==null)
                temp.leftChild=root.rightChild;
            else
                temp.rightChild=root.rightChild;
            return root.leftChild;
        }
    } 
    

The method should be called like

tree.root = trim(tree.root, min, max);
share|improve this answer
1  
Holy mother of all necros Batman. One of us should get a badge for this. – Justin May 8 '15 at 9:26

When working with a tree I find it easiest to have recursive methods which take a Node and return a Node, the idea being that I can then call the method to "update" nodes beneath me by calling the method on them.

In this case, for instance, you could have Node minBound(Node) which returns the subtree of this node which is above the lower bound. If the current Node is in the bound then apply recursively to each child and return yourself. If the current Node is not in the bound then return the updated child Node in the correct direction. If the current Node is null then just return null.

An equivalent method must be written for maxBound.

Then you can just do minBound(maxBound(root)) to get the new root for the tree.

(You could combine minBound and maxBound into the one method, but for ease of explanation I decided to split them out.)

EDIT: Since it's been so long, I thought I'd actually put a code sample up to show what I mean.

public void trim(int min, int max) {
  overallRoot = minBound(maxBound(overallRoot,max),min);
}

private IntTreeNode minBound(IntTreeNode node, int min) {
  if (node == null) // base case of our recursion
    return null;
  if (node.value < min) // we're too small, but our larger children might be in
    return minBound(node.right, min);
  // if we make it to here then we're in bounds, so update our left child
  // (our right child is bigger than us, so doesn't need to be processed)
  node.left = minBound(node.left, min);
  return node;
}

private IntTreeNode maxBound(IntTreeNode node, int max) {
  if (node == null) // base case of our recursion
    return null;
  if (node.value > max) // we're too big, but our smaller children might be in
    return maxBound(node.left, max);
  // if we make it to here then we're in bounds, so update our right child
  // (our left child is smaller than us, so doesn't need to be processed)
  node.right = maxBound(node.right, max);
  return node;
}
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