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I have some experience in using threads and processes in Windows.

May someone explain, is there any mapping possible the threads and processes in windows to the same in Linux?

That means, Threads in Windows == Threads in Linux? -> Makes any sense? Process in Windows == Process in Linus? -> Makes any sense?

If same, I have CreateThread() and CreateProcess() calls in windows, what are the equivalent calls in linux?

I have read some posts in SO but most of them haven't cleared my doubts.So thought to start a new post.

It would be nice If I get some explanation with some simple examples(C programming).

share|improve this question
2  
Look up the pthread_create and fork calls in Linux. – Joachim Pileborg Mar 20 '12 at 6:13
1  
And don't expect an equivalence between Linux and Windows system calls. Concepts and terminology are slightly different. – Basile Starynkevitch Mar 20 '12 at 6:19
    
Well, strictly, Linux does not have threads at all, it only knows processes, and, more recently, processes that share an address space and/or file descriptors. Also it never creates new processes, it only ever makes copies of them. Insofar, even if similar or identical end results can be achieved, there is no real 1:1 correspondence in how stuff works. – Damon Mar 20 '12 at 10:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, there are equivalent calls for your purpose in Linux, but they work a little different, at least for the process mechanism.

  1. For threads, you can use pthread_create. It works in a very similar fashion to CreateThread, except some parameters are different. Should be very easy to use. Here's a good tutorial: https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/pthreads/

  2. Emulating CreateProcess in order to start an external process is not so straightforward. You will need the famous fork/exec combo. First, you need to call fork inside the main process to spawn a child process. This child is created by duplicating the initial process. You can then control the flow by checking the value returned by fork:

 int rv = fork(); 
 // new process was spawned here. The following code is executed 
 // by both processes.
 if(rv == 0)
 {
     // we are in the child process
 }
 else
 {
     // we are in the parent
 }

Basically rv will be 0 for the child and the pid of the child for the parent. I hope I haven't lost you so far. :)

Moving on, you will need a call to one of the exec family of functions to start an external process:

 int rv = fork(); 
 // new process was spawned here. The following code is executed 
 // by both processes.
 if(rv == 0)
 {
     execl("/bin/ls", "ls", NULL); // start the ls process
 }
 else
 {
     // we are in the parent
 }

In the above example, I am starting the /bin/ls external process, which prints the contents of the current folder.

Here's a simple full example: http://flinflon.brandonu.ca/dueck/2001/62306/Processes/Unix%20Examples.htm

Now you may be wondering why you need to call fork in the first place and why execl is not enough. This is because after the program invoked by execl terminates, the current process is also terminated, and you don't want that to happen in the main process.

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Thanks....Nice answer. – Renjith G Mar 20 '12 at 7:43
    
:Not possible to start the new process from as soon as returning the fork().I mean dont we need to execute the next line after fork(), if we can possible to pass the executable to spawned as part of the fork, that would be logical right like the createProcess in windows? – Renjith G Mar 20 '12 at 7:45
    
@Renjith G: I'm afraid not. fork does not take any parameters. It's only purpose is to duplicate the current process into a new one. fork/exec is the standard linux way of launching an external process. – Tudor Mar 20 '12 at 7:55
    
Cool, so the new forked process has got a new PID right?Does the thread ID in the child process and parent process are same? – Renjith G Mar 20 '12 at 8:01
1  
There is a posix_spawn() function supported by modern Linux that is a closer analogue of CreateProcess(). – caf Mar 20 '12 at 11:46

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