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Newbie to c# here, first time dealing with event handlers. one step of a program I am writing involves changing the clipboard every time a file is created in a certain location. Here is what I have come up with so far:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        [STAThread]
        public static void Main()
        {
            FileSystemWatcher watcher = new FileSystemWatcher();
            watcher.Path = @"C:\Input\";
            watcher.Filter = "*.csv";
            watcher.Created += new FileSystemEventHandler(ProcessFile);
            watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
        public static void ProcessFile(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                Clipboard.SetText("text");
            }
            catch (Exception exc)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(exc);
                Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }
    }
}

An exception is thrown that the current thread is not in STA mode and needs to be marked in the Main method, but I believe that I did this. How can I change the clipboard here?

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1 Answer 1

The problem is that FileSystemWatcher will fire off the event on a separate thread. You need to do something so that the clipboard operation happens in the same thread as your Main method.

Approach #1: Use Application.Run, even though you don’t use WinForms. What this does is it spins a loop on the main thread, waiting for events. Something like this:

static Form InvokerForm;

public static void Main()
{
    InvokerForm = new Form();
    var dummy = InvokerForm.Handle; // form handle creation is lazy; force it to happen

    var watcher = new FileSystemWatcher();
    watcher.SynchronizingObject = InvokerForm;
    watcher.Path = @"C:\Input\";
    watcher.Filter = "*.csv";
    watcher.Created += new FileSystemEventHandler(ProcessFile);
    watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

    Application.Run();
}

This tells the watcher to call Invoke on that (invisible) form you create, passing your handler as an argument. This basically queues it for invocation later. In the meantime, Application.Run sits on the main thread, spinning a loop waiting for just such an occurrence. When it notices that, it goes ahead and invokes ProcessFile – on the correct thread.

Approach #2: If this seems too hacky, that’s because it kind of is. The "correct" approach would be to use a custom SynchronizingObject. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be one built-in, but there is an article describing how to create a delegate queue that implements ISynchronizeInvoke.

The net effect of this approach is the same: you end up having something sitting on your main thread, waiting for invocations to get requested, and then performing them. Only this time you get to code all the innards of that, while making the program a little leaner on system resource usage.

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