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I have a script running some Mercurial commands in non-interactive mode on a build server. One of the commands merges two branches and there is always a conflict in the .hgtags file during the merge because of the way the build scripts are set up.

How can I force Mercurial to always merge the .hgtags file using changes from both files, first from one, then from the other?

For example, if I the files to merge were

A
B
C

and

A
B
D

I would like the result to be

A
B
C
D

I am guessing I will need a custom merge tool. What tool provides this functionality?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Yes, you need to configure a custom merge tool for your .hgtags file. Mercurial doesn't provide any special merge tool for .hgtags, you're expected to merge it by hand using your normal three-way merge tool.

Conflicts in the .hgtags file can have two types:

  • Silly conflicts: This is the situation you have and there is not really a conflict here. What happens is that one branch has

    f40273b0ad7b3a6d3012fd37736d0611f41ecf54 A
    0a28dfe59f8fab54a5118c5be4f40da34a53cdb7 B
    12e0fdbc57a0be78f0e817fd1d170a3615cd35da C
    

    and the other branch has

    f40273b0ad7b3a6d3012fd37736d0611f41ecf54 A
    0a28dfe59f8fab54a5118c5be4f40da34a53cdb7 B
    979c049974485125e1f9357f6bbe9c1b548a64c3 D
    

    Each tag refers to exactly one changeset, so there's no conflict here. The merge should of course be the union on of the two files:

    f40273b0ad7b3a6d3012fd37736d0611f41ecf54 A
    0a28dfe59f8fab54a5118c5be4f40da34a53cdb7 B
    12e0fdbc57a0be78f0e817fd1d170a3615cd35da C
    979c049974485125e1f9357f6bbe9c1b548a64c3 D
    
  • Real conflicts: There one branch has

    f40273b0ad7b3a6d3012fd37736d0611f41ecf54 A
    0a28dfe59f8fab54a5118c5be4f40da34a53cdb7 B
    12e0fdbc57a0be78f0e817fd1d170a3615cd35da C
    

    and the other branch has

    f40273b0ad7b3a6d3012fd37736d0611f41ecf54 A
    0a28dfe59f8fab54a5118c5be4f40da34a53cdb7 B
    979c049974485125e1f9357f6bbe9c1b548a64c3 C
    

    There is a real conflict here: hg tag C was done on both branches, but the tags refer to different changesets. Resolving this is a manual task.

If you can guarantee that you'll only have silly conflicts and that you only have one tag per changeset, then you can use

hg log -r "tagged()" --template "{node} {tags}\n" > .hgtags

to generate a new .hgtags file. The key insight is that Mercurial knows how to merge tags internally! It does this all the time when you have two heads with different .hgtags files. The above template simply generates a new .hgtags file based on this internal merge.

If you might have more than one tag per changeset, then the above wont work — all the tags are printed on one line so you get a tag foo bar instead of two tags foo and bar. You can then use this style file instead:

changeset = "{tags}"
tag = "{node} {tag}\n"

It outputs one line per tag, not changeset. You save this style somewhere and configure a merge tool:

[merge-tools]
hgtags.executable = hg
hgtags.args = log -r "tagged()" --style ~/tmp/tags-style > $output
hgtags.premerge = False

[merge-patterns]
.hgtags = hgtags

You now have automatic tag merges. There are some caveats:

  1. Three or more heads: The technique only works if you have two heads at the time of merging. If you have three heads or more, it's possible for a deleted tag to re-appear. If you have heads X, Y, and Z, and the tag A is deleted in X, then Mercurial is normally able to figure out that A is deleted overall. It does this based on a 000...0 A line in the .hgtags file in X. However, if you merge X and Y to get W, then the approach suggested will not contain any such 000...0 A line. The definition of A from Z will now suddenly take effect and re-introduce A.

  2. Real conflicts: If you have real conflicts in .hgtags, then the above method will silently pick the tag from the most recent head for you. The merge tool basically saves hg tags in .hgtags, and the behavior of hg tags with multiple heads is explained in the wiki. Since hg tags unconditionally reads and silently merges the .hgtags file from all heads, there's nothing we can do about it with this simple approach. Dealing with this would require a bigger script that reads the two .hgtags files and detects the conflict.

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See bitbucket.org/xrstf/tagsmerger/wiki/Home for a merge tool that resolves silly conflicts. :) –  xrstf Mar 20 '12 at 11:11
    
@xrstf: I actually saw this the other day. I didn't recommend it since I don't think it works correctly when there are more than two heads. Simply deleting the 000...0 lines will re-introduce tags like I explain in my answer. –  Martin Geisler Mar 20 '12 at 12:05
    
Excellent, I applaud! Can I ask, when this notrs will appear on Aragost's site? We'll lost it here –  Lazy Badger Mar 21 '12 at 0:38
1  
@LazyBadger: Thanks! Putting this kind of information on aragost.com could make sense and I would of course like to drive more people to our site. But I'm also considering to make a page at aragost.com that will point back to my favorite Stack Overflow questions so that I have something to point clients to. I'm not sure which way I'll go yet. –  Martin Geisler Mar 21 '12 at 7:54
1  
When I add this to [merge-tools], mercurial starts using it for all merges because all the default merge tools have negative priorities. I had to add gvimdiff.priority = 1 to the [merge-tools] section to get around this, as discussed in this thread. –  talljosh Mar 6 '13 at 5:55

You can not automatically resolve merge-conflicts by performing unattended merge. Without merge (i.e. selecting "only my" or "only other") it will work.

I'm afraid, you have badly planned workflow - build-server must not perform any actions, which modify sources. It's task for human and human's choice.

But I suppose, exact data inside .hgtags have to value for build-server (it uses own clone, not populated to anybody, I hope?!), thus you can define any merge-policy in command and have (bad, with data-loss) .hgtags merged

BTW, "first from one, then from the other" in any language, using only formal logic, for pair

A
B
C

and

A
B
D

means ABCABD result

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1  
"first from one, then from the other" in the context of resolving a conflict usually refers to using the conflicted lines from both files in the result file: first from one file, then from the other. It's a standard feature of any graphic merge tool, so I assumed everyone who had used one before would understan what I mean. –  Alexey Blinov Mar 20 '12 at 7:50
2  
@krtek - Build server MUST NOT modify code, only build. I reserve rights to tell the truth to everybody –  Lazy Badger Mar 20 '12 at 9:31
1  
@Tim Yes, can not! Inform me about results, write log. btw, illuminate repo as Christmas Tree - each sucessful (buldable) commit have tag is ugly idea. Moved one tag - useless –  Lazy Badger Mar 21 '12 at 0:35
1  
@Alexey - merge for this??? Oh, my god! Clone (central?) repo (or blindly pull -u), build, tag, commit, push –  Lazy Badger Mar 21 '12 at 2:07
1  
@Tim - no way, but - this is not needed at all. My commit just create new tag, push without -f disallow me (Build-server) to create new head. With -f I'll get additional head, but build-master (created from proteins, not silicon) will resolve this "issue" in seconds. Can't see issue here except your wish to object me to any fines –  Lazy Badger Mar 21 '12 at 5:22

You don't actually need to merge the .hgtags file. It can be different on different branches and Mercurial will correctly list all tags across all branches.

We use the merge-patterns configuration option to tell Mercurial to use the local branch when doing merges of .hgtags. Add the following to your repository's hgrc file:

 [merge-patterns]
 .hgtags = internal:local

When doing a merge involving the .hgtags file, .hgtags will show as modified, but not be changed.

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1  
Not a good idea, you could loose tags from the other head. –  Jesse May 27 at 8:54

You should try diffmerge, it's awesome!

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1  
I think the OP is looking for a way to automatically merge these files. –  krtek Mar 20 '12 at 7:06
    
For a way, you can simply edit the conflicted file as you like, but that will be a headache if there's a lot of conflicts involved, and that's why I recommended a nice tool like diffmerge for the OP. And there's no such tool that will help you automatically resolve a conflict, a tool will assit you in doing that. –  neevek Mar 20 '12 at 7:12

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