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I am trying to do a find and replace with sed and BASH variables. As the replaced content contains many / characters, I have used # instead of /, as is typically used in sed:

 sed -i "0,\#^$word#s##$replacement#" ./file

The item I want to replace contains the \ symbol:

 replacement=$(echo "\macro{30\percent of bears eat fish.}")

However, when I do the replacement, \ always disappears.

  • I do not have control over the content within "\macro{30\percent of bears eat fish.}"
  • If \t appears, it is interpreted as an indent, but I just want it to print as \t in the output.

How can I do a find and replace with sed when \, /, or other symbols might be found within the replacement text?

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2  
I've tested your sed command, it appears to me that the combination ^$ is causing problems. Without the ^ it works for me. No solution for this though. –  Bernhard Mar 20 '12 at 8:06
1  
It would be helpful if you could show us a real test case. As I demonstrated below, I can't duplicate the problems you're having. –  ghoti Mar 20 '12 at 12:12
    
See my post if you want to get the job done well in any of your regex projects. –  user735796 May 9 '12 at 22:52
    
Actually what you are describing is interpretation. If you don't want it interpreted you'll need to backslash escape the backslash. You can do that with a regular expression using my method: tabs=$(sed.esc '\t'); etabs=$(sed.esc '\\t'); sed -e "s/$tabs/$etabs/g" < ./inputfile; Now you can perform your operations as previously desired. ie pipe that output into your filter. –  user735796 May 10 '12 at 14:18
    
you can also specify the echo -E "\t words ..." to supress backslash interpretation by the shell. –  user735796 May 10 '12 at 14:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50
word=$(echo -E "wo\rd")
replacement=$(echo -E "r/e\p")

echo -ne "a\nb\nc\nd\nwo\\\\rd\ne\nf\n" | sed -e "0,\#^${word//\\/\\\\}# s##${replacement//\\/\\\\}#"

Note that you will still have problems with other characters, & and # in replacement string and of course all valid regex characters in the word string

The below takes care of the regular expression chars

word=$(echo -E "^\$.*[#]wo\rd" | sed 's:[]\[\^\$\.\*#\\]:\\&:g')
replacement=$(echo -E "&#r/e\p" | sed 's:[&#\\]:\\&:g')

echo -ne "a\nb\nc\nd\n^\$.*[#]wo\\\\rd\ne\nf\n" | sed -e "0,\#^${word}# s##${replacement}#"
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Backslashes make life complicated

Life always gets tricky when you have the shell and sed both trying to interpret backslashes. In fact, it gets really painful.

Let's take a simple case: you want sed to replace the first backslash on a line by an at sign:

sed 's/\\/@/' file

Note that we needed to specify two backslashes here, and because the command was in single quotes, the shell didn't do any interpretation for us — thank goodness!

Now, let's suppose we need to use double quotes instead of single quotes. Now we need to type:

sed "s/\\\\/@/" file

Why? Because the shell first scans the string, and it sees backslash-backslash and translates that to a single backslash; and then it sees a second backslash-backslash and translates that to another single backslash. So, then sed gets to see the two backslashes and does what you wanted it to do.


bash-as-bash behaves differently from bash-as-sh

You may have a /bin/echo on your machine (I do on mine, which is Mac OS X 10.7.3) which behaves differently from bash's built-in echo. I can get the following output (from /bin/bash):

$ echo '\\' | sed "s/\\\\/@/"
@\
$ /bin/echo '\\' | sed "s/\\\\/@/"
@\
$ echo '\\' | sed 's/\\\\/@/'
@
$ /bin/echo '\\' | sed 's/\\\\/@/'
@
$ 

Let's throw another spanner in the works (my brain's hurting — how's yours coping?). I get a different answer from /bin/sh (which is very similar but not identical to /bin/bash; the difference is 64 bytes on disk, and both are bash version 3.2):

$ echo '\\' | sed "s/\\\\/@/"
@
$ /bin/echo '\\' | sed "s/\\\\/@/"
@\
$ echo '\\' | sed 's/\\\\/@/'
\
$ /bin/echo '\\' | sed 's/\\\\/@/'
@
$

Yes, there's a difference. And now I'm confused!


In your discussion, you mention using:

replacement=$(echo "\\\macro{some text}")

This complicates life. You've got the shell processing that text, and bash's built-in echo also processing the text. And if you use bash as sh you get one answer and if you use bash as bash you get another answer.

When I tested with bash as sh, I found:

replacement="\\\\macro{some text}"   # 4 slashes, not 3

This gets two backslashes into $replacement. You can demonstrate that by running:

$ /bin/echo "$replacement"
\\macro{some text}
$ echo "$replacement"
\macro{some text}
$

So helpful...so, to get the $(echo ...) to produce two backslashes in the output when you subsequently echo it, you need no fewer than 16 (!) backslashes in the string:

$ replacement=$(echo "\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\macro{some text}")
$ echo "$replacement"
\\macro{some text}
$

Beware: that applies to bash-as-sh; running bash-as-bash, you get:

$ replacement=$(echo "\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\macro{some text}")
$ echo "$replacement"
\\\\\\\\macro{some text
$

Isn't life fun! So, to get this to work, you're going to have to preprocess your search pattern and your replacement patterns rather carefully to get enough backslashes into each one. How many? Ugh...


Test script

Here's a test script which I called, with stunning originality and explicitness of name, xx:

#!/bin/bash

echo "happy /word/ today" > file

word="/word/"
/bin/echo "word=<<$word>>"

replacement='\\\\macro{some text}'
/bin/echo "repl=<<$replacement>>"
echo "repl=<<$replacement>>"

/bin/echo sed -e "s#$word#$replacement#" file
sed -e "s#$word#$replacement#" file

echo
replacement="\\\\macro{some text}"
/bin/echo "repl=<<$replacement>>"
echo "repl=<<$replacement>>"

/bin/echo sed -e "s#$word#$replacement#" file
sed -e "s#$word#$replacement#" file


echo
replacement=$(echo "\\\\\\\\macro{some text}")
/bin/echo "$replacement"
echo "$replacement"
echo

replacement=$(echo "\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\macro{some text}")
/bin/echo "$replacement"
echo "$replacement"

Test script run by bash-as-bash

This is the output from bash xx:

$ bash xx
word=<</word/>>
repl=<<\\\\macro{some text}>>
repl=<<\\\\macro{some text}>>
sed -e s#/word/#\\\\macro{some text}# file
happy \\macro{some text} today

repl=<<\\macro{some text}>>
repl=<<\\macro{some text}>>
sed -e s#/word/#\\macro{some text}# file
happy \macro{some text} today

\\\\macro{some text}
\\\\macro{some text}

\\\\\\\\macro{some text}
\\\\\\\\macro{some text}
$ 

Test script run by bash-as-sh

And this is the output from sh xx:

$ sh xx
word=<</word/>>
repl=<<\\\\macro{some text}>>
repl=<<\\macro{some text}>>
sed -e s#/word/#\\\\macro{some text}# file
happy \\macro{some text} today

repl=<<\\macro{some text}>>
repl=<<\macro{some text}>>
sed -e s#/word/#\\macro{some text}# file
happy \macro{some text} today

\\macro{some text}
\macro{some text}

\\\\macro{some text}
\\macro{some text}
$ 

Somewhere in amongst all that is (most of) the answer to your problem. To say I was surprised to find this much difference between bash-as-bash and bash-as-sh doesn't begin to cover the territory.

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1  
Don't mean to impose, but a small correction: UGLY CODE makes life difficult. Backslashes make life interesting. Your example is too complex and long winded IMHO. Take a look at my example and look at yours. I'm sure you will agree. –  user735796 May 9 '12 at 22:54
    
tl;dr, wow, way to make a simple problem difficult –  wich May 12 '12 at 6:51

Your problem may not be the backslashes. Or at least, one of your problems. :-)

In the sed installed on my system, you can use # as the delimiter of your substitution (i.e. s#pattern#replacement#), but not as part of your initial search. Thus, you would have to use something like:

 sed -i "1,/^$word/s##$replacement#" ./file

See my results:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf 'one\ntwo\nthree\nfour\nfive\n' | sed '1,/three/d'
four
five
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf 'one\ntwo\nthree\nfour\nfive\n' | sed '1,#three#d'
sed: 1: "1,#three#d": expected context address
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

I'm in FreeBSD, but I'm pretty sure the GNU sed works the same way.

This doesn't help you if there are incompatible characters in the pattern you're trying to match, though. You just need to make sure that $word is a properly formatted regular expression that can be used within sed.

As for the backslashes ... if the advice above gives you any sed joy, try just doubling any backslashes in the replacement pattern. But work on just one problem at a time, and start with simpler $replacements to make sure your basic sed notation is functioning.

UPDATE:

Also, for the fun of it:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ word="word"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ replacement="\\\macro{some text};"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf "Replace a word with some text.\n" | sed "s#$word#$replacement#"
Replace a \macro{some text}; with some text.
[ghoti@pc ~]$ replacement="\\\\macro{some text};"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf "Replace a word with some text.\n" | sed "s#$word#$replacement#"
Replace a \macro{some text}; with some text.
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf "Replace a word with some text.\n" | sed "s/$word/$replacement/"
Replace a \macro{some text}; with some text.
[ghoti@pc ~]$ word="two"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf "one\ntwo\nthree\n" | sed "s/^$word/$replacement/"
one
\macro{some text};
three
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 
share|improve this answer
    
This one gives me sed: -e expression #1, char 0: no previous regular expression. –  Village May 11 '12 at 0:36
    
You can use any character as part of the match pattern in sed, you just need to escape the first one with a backslash, which is exactly what Village did –  wich May 12 '12 at 6:50
    
I should have said as delimiter for the match pattern instead of as part of the match pattern –  wich May 12 '12 at 8:13

This might work for you:

sed -i "0,\#^$word#s##$(printf '%q' $replacement)#" ./file
share|improve this answer
    
make it a function. why rewrite this code when it clearly has structure? Are you a coder or a programmer? You approach the problem as if you were comparing apples to oranges. Computers do two things well: Input, output. You are not leveraging this advantage. –  user735796 May 9 '12 at 22:56
    
This gives me sed: -e expression #1, char 0: invalid reference \3 on s' command's RHS`. –  Village May 11 '12 at 0:34
    
this won't work, sed will still interpret the backslashes as escape sequences –  wich May 12 '12 at 6:24

Try this (if I understand your problem correctly):

R="macro{some text}"
sed -i "0,\#^$word#s##\\$R#" ./file
share|improve this answer
    
If R="macro(some \text}", the \t in \text gets interpreted as an indent, and is replaced with an indent. –  Village May 11 '12 at 0:38
    
this still fails if there are backslashes in R –  wich May 12 '12 at 6:22

Try this

Input

/home/Scripts/dummyrun 

Unix Command

$> sed -i "s%/home/Scripts/dummyrun%Newpath%g" Input

Output

Open the Input file and changes will be reflected automatically.

 $> cat Input 
    Newpath

The above command replaces /home/Scripts/dummyrun to Newpath in Input file.

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What does this have to do with the question? –  wich May 12 '12 at 6:23
    
I just wanted to help by giving a code to replace '/' characters if present in the replacement text while using sed.....the last part of the question !! –  Debaditya May 12 '12 at 8:32
    
as you can see the poster already used a different character for the subst command, the question was about /, \ and other symbols, which this answer does not address at all –  wich May 12 '12 at 8:39
    
@wich o yes i understand now ...... sure from now onwards i will take care before posting any answer ... thanks :) –  Debaditya May 12 '12 at 9:07

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