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I have the same query written in both LINQ and the Lambda-expressions way:

LINQ:

var str = (from userInfo in context.UserInfos
 join user in context.Users on userInfo.UserId equals user.UserID
 join membership in context.Memberships on userInfo.UserId equals membership.UserId
 where user.UserName == userName
 select new UserData
  {
     UserName = user.UserName,
     FirstName = userInfo.FirstName,
     LastName = userInfo.LastName,
     Email = membership.Email,
     UserId = user.UserID
 });

Lambda-Expressions:

var str1 = context.Users.Where(p => p.UserName == userName).Select(p => new
            {
                UserName = p.UserName,
                FirstName = p.UserInfo.FirstName,
                LastName = p.UserInfo.LastName,
                Email = p.UserInfo.Membership.Email,
                UserId = p.UserID
            });

So I looked at the code that they generate, and it seems that the LINQ query generates code that is more flexble than the code with Lambda-Expressions.

LINQ:

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent2].[UserName] AS [UserName], 
[Extent1].[FirstName] AS [FirstName], 
[Extent1].[LastName] AS [LastName], 
[Extent3].[Email] AS [Email], 
[Extent2].[UserID] AS [UserID]
FROM   [dbo].[UserInfo] AS [Extent1]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[aspnet_Users] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[UserId] = [Extent2].[UserID]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[aspnet_Membership] AS [Extent3] ON [Extent1].[UserId] = [Extent3].[UserId]
WHERE [Extent2].[UserName] = @p__linq__0

Lambda-Expressions:

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent1].[UserName] AS [UserName], 
[Extent3].[FirstName] AS [FirstName], 
[Extent4].[LastName] AS [LastName], 
[Extent6].[Email] AS [Email], 
[Extent1].[UserID] AS [UserID]
FROM      [dbo].[aspnet_Users] AS [Extent1]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[UserInfo] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[UserID] = [Extent2].[UserId]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[UserInfo] AS [Extent3] ON [Extent2].[UserId] = [Extent3].[UserId]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[UserInfo] AS [Extent4] ON [Extent2].[UserId] = [Extent4].[UserId]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[UserInfo] AS [Extent5] ON [Extent2].[UserId] = [Extent5].[UserId]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[aspnet_Membership] AS [Extent6] ON [Extent5].[UserId] = [Extent6].[UserId]
WHERE [Extent1].[UserName] = @p__linq__0

So I have two questions:

  1. It seems that the LINQ query generated more flexible code and I guess it will work faster. Does this mean that join expressions are better to write in standard LINQ query?
  2. What does 1 AS [C1] mean in both generated codes? Why does LINQ generate that code?
share|improve this question
    
Which one are you going to keep ? Will the choice depend on the answers you get here ? I find the Lambda far more readable, therefore I would keep that one personnaly. –  squelos Mar 20 '12 at 8:26
1  
I'm 99.9% sure it's there to prevent Cartesian product. BTW that SQL generated by the Lambda is TERRIBLE. –  Phill Mar 20 '12 at 8:29
    
Now I'm thinking about "how fast will my queries execute in future". –  Chuck Norris Mar 20 '12 at 8:32

2 Answers 2

I have same query written in both LINQ and Lambda-expressions way.

No you don't. Your query expression has two inner joins; your method call notation version doesn't. Additionally, your query expression builds a new UserData object in its select clause, whereas your method call version uses an anonymous type.

If you want to write your query expression version using method notation, you'd need to introduce transparent identifiers - it would get messy (joins usually do in method call notation). Your method call notation is easily expressed as a query expression though:

var str = from userInfo in context.UserInfos
          where user.UserName == userName
          select new
          {
              UserName = p.UserName,
              FirstName = p.UserInfo.FirstName,
              LastName = p.UserInfo.LastName,
              Email = p.UserInfo.Membership.Email,
              UserId = p.UserID
          };

The AS parts in the generated SQL are just to allow the query to distinguish between the same column names coming from either different tables or different rows within the tables, all within the same result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Jon. And what you suggest to use expressions like you written or expression with inner joins? –  Chuck Norris Mar 20 '12 at 8:33
    
Which one will be faster? –  Chuck Norris Mar 20 '12 at 8:33
2  
@ChuckNorris: Using query expressions or not makes no difference; they compile to the same code. Using joins may make the query execute more quickly in SQL - look at the query profiler. Using joins would almost certainly help in LINQ to Objects. Ultimately though, the correctness is the most important thing - use the query which most readably expresses exactly what you want. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '12 at 9:15

I'm pretty sure that you will be able to write a lambda expression based linq query that will generate the same sql as your non lambda linq one. The join operator can also be used with lambdas. But it's likely to be a lot uglier than the non lambda version.

The AS operator is just an alias in SQL, it allows you to refer to a column or table using a different name to that which it's saved under in the table. It's a lot like naming local variables in your c# code to make it easier to sense what's going on.

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