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I have a question about code style:

Let's assume i have a String containing some information (like "Information1" or "Information2"). Based on this i want to create objects with a factory. Obviously i could write something like this:

if(string.equals("Information1")){
  Factory.createInformation1Object();
}
if(string.equals("Information2")){
  Factory.createInformation2Object();
}
if(string.equals("Information3")){
  Factory.createInformation3Object();
}

Now i was wondering if there is a better (and prettier) way to do this. I really like the multiple dispatch idea of the visitor pattern, but i cant see a way to apply this easily to this particular problem.

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you could probably use a regex like "information[0-9]" with a matcher ? But I don't better way. –  Kiwy Mar 20 '12 at 9:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use the abstract factory pattern.

Create an abstract Factory class [or interface], and classes that extends it: MyObject1Factory, MyObject2Factory, ...

On preprocessing, populate a Map<String,Factory> from a String to the coresponding Factory instance, this is done only once in your application.

When you need to create a new instance - invoke map.get(string).create() to create the relevant object, of the relevant type.

Edit: Small example with code:
Your classes are:

public static class MyBase { 
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Base";
    }
}
public static class Class1 extends MyBase { 
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Class1";
    }
}
public static class Class2 extends MyBase { 
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Class2";
    }
}

And your factories will be:

public static abstract class MyFactory {
    public abstract MyBase build();
}
public static class MyFactory1 extends MyFactory {
    @Override
    public Class1 build() {
        return new Class1();
    }
}
public static class MyFactory2 extends MyFactory {
    @Override
    public Class2 build() {
        return new Class2();
    }
}

populate a map only once in the program lifetime:

    Map<String,MyFactory> map = new HashMap<String, Test.MyFactory>();
    map.put("class1", new MyFactory1());
    map.put("class2", new MyFactory2());

and when you need a new object, invoke with:

    MyBase obj = map.get(s).build();
    System.out.println(obj);

(*) Note: The static keyword for classes are here because I created them as inner classes - of course you need to ommit it if it is not your case....

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In Java 7 you can now use strings in switch statements.

Note that your code isn't directly analagous to a switch statement because it's theoretically possible for all three factory methods to be called just by looking at the structure of the code (e.g. no else statements). But in practice that can't happen because string can't simultaneously have all three values.

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would using a switch statement really be any better in terms of readability and usability? I would still have a massive amount of code in one place, except i have cases instead of ifs –  Simiil Mar 20 '12 at 9:08
    
Depends on exactly what you were asking! I interpreted the question as being about the string handling (since that's what the subject implied), whereas others have interpreted it as being about the overall design, patterns, etc. –  dty Mar 20 '12 at 9:09
    
In other words, from a design perspective, no, it doesn't materially improve matters. –  dty Mar 20 '12 at 9:09

I prefer functional and readable. :-) If string is null and calling its method will definitely throw NPE, consider the following instead,

"Information1".equals(strings)

Perhaps Information1, Information2, and Information3 can be put as class static variable so it could be easily reference and prevent human typo error.

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Yoda, you are!! –  dty Mar 20 '12 at 9:02
    
Another new nick I got, today! –  Jasonw Mar 20 '12 at 9:09

You can use switch statement newly in Java 7. here

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Better to use switch-case, because of the unnesessery checks if first or second check is true. In default section you could place other activity like exception throwing or so on.

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