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What is the right way to use quotation marks ?

echo 'string' . $variable . 'anotherstring'; 

or

echo "string" . $variable . "anotherstring";

the problem of course comes to light when we need to print, return, or echo the quotaion mrk itself ...

$output = '<div class="' . $class . ' " style =" ' . $style . ' ">' ;

or

$output = "<div class=' " . $class . " ' style =' " . $style . " '>" ;

??

And what about when some jQuery or Javascript enters the game ??

function o99_print_front_script() {
    return '
    <script type="text/javascript">
var pluginDir = " '. PHP_CONSTANT_X .' " ; 

  var cluster_styles = [{
        url:pluginDir +"/images/marker-o.png",
        background: "#c6c6c6"
        textColor: "#0f0"
    }];

      jQuery(document).ready(function() {
        jQuery("#example").example_func({
          elements:".div_1 .class_2",
           infobox: true,   
        map_opt: {zoom: 3,
        mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP},
        infobox_s:s_infobox_k,
        marker_icon:pluginDir +"/images/image_1.png"
});
});
</script>
    ' ;}

OR

function o99_print_front_script() {
    return "
    <script type='text/javascript'>
var pluginDir = ' ". PHP_CONSTANT_X ." ' ; 

  var cluster_styles = [{
        url:pluginDir +'/images/marker-o.png',
        background: '#c6c6c6'
        textColor: '#0f0'
    }];

      jQuery(document).ready(function() {
        jQuery('#example').example_func({
          elements:'.div_1 .class_2',
           infobox: true,   
        map_opt: {zoom: 3,
        mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP},
        infobox_s:s_infobox_k,
        marker_icon:pluginDir +'/images/image_1.png'
});
});
</script>
    " ;}

Is there some specification for this ? Some standard ? some "best practice" ?

Browsing through code you can see all kind of examples .

which one should we use for "first level" and which for "second" ? And what if I have to "nest" 3 levels of those ??

this problem highlights itself when one uses some CMS , or system with "plugins" - and then wants to extend it with own code .the resulted HTML code in the DOM gets all confused, and you can not understand which quotes are which especially when JS is involved).

I am aware that all of them will work, but I want to know which one is right and which is wrong (if such terms exists in regarding this).

EDIT I

After reading comments / answers - I have realised that maybe I wrote the question in an unclear fashion. my question is regarding the Outputted xHTML /JS . Of course that it has direct consequences on the PHP part , but mainly I was wondering what is the best practice to maintain a consistent and uniformal code throught the finished document while maintaining an easy syntax on the back-end.. Even looking at the source of this very page here (this stackexchange site) one can see some inconsistent behavior (at least to me it looks like it )

share|improve this question
    
    
... Proper way to pass complex variables to javascript through HTML, and many others –  outis Mar 20 '12 at 9:28
    
Note you don't need to use the concatenation operator with double-quoted strings. Their whole point is you can interpolate variables directly: "string{$variable}anotherstring". Also, read up on heredocs. –  outis Mar 20 '12 at 9:30
    
@outis - thanks for your comments, but i do not see how url_encode, or escaping quotes , or other question you posted ass possible duplicates will answer my question of proper standard or specification of which one to use first .. –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 9:38
    
@outis - even the PHP documentation you have posted is not consistent with the examples... –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 9:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

About markup nesting I would strongly suggest to adopt the MVC pattern so you will obtain a clear separation of the view (your html template) from the controller part (what you have to put in the template). In this way you can avoid to make a "soup" of unmantainable markup and php code

Anyway for the markup part I prefer writing like so

echo "string $variable anotherstring";

since PHP variables are parsed when included in a string with double-quote delimiters. For long code blocks like the javascript part another possibility is to use HEREDOC syntax so you can write php variables like this

$jssnippet = <<<EOJS
   <script type='text/javascript'>
   var pluginDir = '{$PHP_CONSTANT_X}' ; 
   ...
EOJS;

See also http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.heredoc hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good point about patterns and separation between logic and presentation. HEREDOC is one of the better approaches to this problem. –  Tadeck Mar 20 '12 at 9:49
    
Thanks !! - I did not know about this , and learning something new always makes me happy :-) –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 10:07

If you use double quotes PHP will try evaluate what's inside the string where as single quotes are taken as a literal so as far as performance is concerned if you use single quotes its faster.

share|improve this answer

look at this example

  echo "<a href='javascript:dosomething(\"isn\'t it a good day?\");'></a>";

The main idea is the inner quote must not interfere with the parent ones.

share|improve this answer
1  
isn\'t won't have the desired effect. You are trying to escape it for the ' quotation marks of the attribute, but HTML does not know about these escape sequences. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '12 at 9:40
    
Thanks for your answer - but how does this relate to my question of which quotation mark to use on which level ? –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 9:42
1  
@FelixKling: +1, I believe it would be easier for tpaksu and OP to see the HTML that is being generated: <a href='javascript:dosomething("isn\'t it a good day?");'. You are trying to say that \' will have no effect and the HTML is incorrect (not mentioning the <a> tag is incomplete). –  Tadeck Mar 20 '12 at 9:53
    
@Tadeck: Exactly. But actually the output will be <a href='javascript:dosomething("isn't it a good day?");'. Even if it was properly escaped (\\' to generate \') it wouldn't work. One would have to use the numerical character reference &#39;. More information: w3.org/TR/html4/intro/sgmltut.html#attributes. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '12 at 9:57
    
Thanks all, @Tadeck: I forgot to complete the <a> tag, i just realized that. @Felix Kling and @Tadeck: And that became a good example with the escaping sequences that won't work inside the echo statement. yes you're right and the output would be <a href='javascript:dosomething("isn't it a good day?")'> which still would be causing the javascript not to run. –  Taha Paksu Mar 20 '12 at 10:03

There are quite a few ways to declare and use string literals. It doesn't take long before you start mixing all such methods in your code. I personally prefer using double quoted strings almost everywhere, even if it requires me to write:

"<div foo=\"" . bar() . "\">\$blah</div>";

Double quoted strings allow you to use variables inside strings.

As for the example you mentioned above, there are better, more readable ways to do that, for example:

function k99_print_front_script() {
    ob_start();
    ?>
    <script type='text/javascript'>
        var pluginDir = '<?php echo PHP_CONSTANT_X; ?>'; 
        var cluster_styles = [{
            url:pluginDir +'/images/marker-o.png',
            background: '#c6c6c6'
            textColor: '#0f0'
        }];
        jQuery(document).ready(function() {
            jQuery('#example').example_func({
                elements:'.div_1 .class_2',
                infobox: true,   
                map_opt: {zoom: 3,
                mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP},
                infobox_s:s_infobox_k,
                marker_icon:pluginDir +'/images/image_1.png'
            });
        });
    </script>
    <?php
    return ob_get_clean();
}

As for your question about whether a standard exists or not, I was looking at a couple of PHP code formatters which brought me to this page: PEAR Manual -- Coding Standards. I failed to find recommendation about strings, although the examples consistently used ' enclosed strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ! I usually also use single quotes. It is strange there is no standard for this . maybe this should be proposed to PEAR ? or to some other coding standards organization .. :-) and thanks for your OB_start() method - I already used it in the past, especially for writing JS on-the-fly.. –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 14:53
    
Drupal coding standards regarding the use of quotes also state that there is no hard standard and being consistent is more important. –  Salman A Mar 20 '12 at 14:56
    
I agree that being consistent is important , but the problem with complex systems, especially CMS like Joomla /Drupal / wordpress, is that the final produced xHTML is made of SEVERAL modules / Plugins / themes - that were not made by ONE individual... –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 21 '12 at 16:28

for php it makes a difference whether you use " or '. ' is more performant than " because it won't parse the string to check for variables to substitute.

As for Javascript - use the ones you like... JS doesn't care. This makes it easy if you need to use quotes inside strings, simply use both var mystring = "I said 'Hello World!'";.

share|improve this answer
1  
No. Magic Quotes are something entirely unrelated to the use of interpolation with ". –  Quentin Mar 20 '12 at 9:25
    
" is not only slower (however insignificantly), but will also hurt if you will use $something notation (dolar sign and then some letters) in JavaScript (which is eg. preferred by some to store jQuery objects). See this for a proof: ideone.com/xhFK8 –  Tadeck Mar 20 '12 at 9:47
    
I don't know what you are trying to say with that, but in JS there is no difference between single- and doublequotes, neither performance- nor otherwise. –  Christoph Mar 20 '12 at 10:02
    
@Tadeck: the example you link to doesn't exhibit poor performance, it shows an invalid script (missing variable names). A $ in a JS variable has no affect whatsoever; it's the same as, say, prefixing a variable with _. Both are simply valid identifier characters. –  outis Mar 20 '12 at 17:53
    
@outis: The link proves what I said. If you 1) use $ char in variable names within JavaScript (or actually anywhere in the script) enclosed within double quotes ("), you could expect such behaviour, which may be troublesome, 2) single quotes (') used for quoting such string will have different result. If you do not believe, you could try it yourself or see my extended example of this possible pitfail (or "gotcha"): ideone.com/ZBb4e. And yes, you correctly assume that $something, as I already mentioned, is correct name for JavaScript variable. Any other questions? –  Tadeck Mar 20 '12 at 18:30

For HTML and Javascript it's down to preference, but PHP is different.

In HTML, tag attributes can be either double or single quotes - this is defined in the spec. If you check page sources, most people seem to use double quotes, but there is nothing to stop you using single quotes.

In Javascript there is no reason to use one more than the other - indeed, usage seems to be pretty split. One consideration that you've noted, is that if you're double quoting your HTML attributes, then single quoting your Javascript strings means you can use inline Javascript without breaking your normal style. E.g. <a href="alert('Hello, world')">. A good introduction is available here.

PHP is different however. Double quoted strings are parsed for variables, requiring additional overhead. It's not going to be a massive drain, but it's certainly good practice. In PHP

$string = 'This is my ' . $variable;

and

$string = "This is my $variable";

produce equivalent output. For that reason, it is more efficient to use single quoted strings in PHP, or learn to use double quoted string syntax when necessary.

In the end, it's entirely up to you, but these are the norms. You won't be penalised if you stray from standard usage, but it's important to understand the full implications, especially with PHP.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you for your answer . But my question was if there is some standard or specification regarding this . I know both will work .. –  Obmerk Kronen Mar 20 '12 at 9:45
    
Sure, the HTML and PHP links I provided are the only official documentation on the subject that I know of. Sorry if I came across as overly-simplistic. –  Liam Newmarch Mar 20 '12 at 9:54

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