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I have an app that connects to an URL every X seconds in an onPostExecute of a library that I had done. When I close the app or go back with the back button, it must stop with an override of the onPause() method on the main activity class. I want to control this with my own library to facilitate the creation of class for new developers, but if I override it on the library onPause() method, it continues making connections. There's a way to do these on my library?

Here my code on the main class:

@Override
public void onPause() {
    super.onPause();
    myLib.stopResource();
    myLib.flagRefresh = false;
}

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
     if (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK) {
        myLib.stopResource();
        myLib.flagRefresh = false;
        super.onBackPressed();
        return true;
     }
     return super.onKeyDown(keyCode, event);    
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use onStop() instead of onPause(), which is called whenever the activity is not shown on screen but is still running, i.e. when the screen goes black. Instead of overwriting onKeyDown() it is better to use onBackPressed() method, however if you place your current code of onPause() inside onStop() it would not be required to overwrite it.

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Yes, it's better now, but my problem continues. With other words, i have a class that calls to another class hosted on my library and i want to catch these events on it. If i use an intent call, it works, but if i make the call like this: myLib = new Lib(attr); [attr is the atributes that i need inside] when i go back, my library doesn't catch the events and continues making connections –  Victor Mar 20 '12 at 10:46
    
I am afraid we have not enough information about the internals of your library and it seems a problem with your library, not your activity. If your library is openning connections and it keeps opening them after you call stopResource() it is a problem with your library. –  Fernando Miguélez Mar 20 '12 at 11:09
    
Yes, it's a problem with my library because i can't catch this events on the library when i go out of it and i want to catch this events on the library, not on the activity. is it posible? –  Victor Mar 20 '12 at 11:44
    
Everything is possible. You can use a plain listener interface (methods implemented by the activity that the library would call back, not only to return a result, but also to report an error). However this is not related to Android at all, it is just plain basic Java programming. –  Fernando Miguélez Mar 20 '12 at 11:58
    
I've done and it works. Thanks! –  Victor Mar 20 '12 at 12:07

The only way I see it is to derive a new class from Activity supporting your library. But this approach will run into a permutational explosion. Any specialist standard activity needs a MyLib-variant too. (ListActivity, FragmentActivity, and so on)

class MyLibActivity extends Activity {
    @Override
    public void onPause() ..

    @Override
    public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event)..

}

So it's probably the best to offer just a support for the pure activity.

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I've done this, but my library doesn't catch it. I think that it's because it is running in background –  Victor Mar 20 '12 at 10:55
    
When your lib is implemented as a service you to do the correct communications. Regardless whether the code is part of the lib or not. –  stefan bachert Mar 20 '12 at 11:05

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