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I am new to javascript, and can't find the solution to this. I have read some of the similar questions, but did not look like the problem was the same as mine.

I call a method from script1 with this code:

 function turnPage(){
    var current = window.now;
    var nextpage = getNextPage(current);
    alert(nextpage);
}

In script2 there is a SQLite etc:

function getNextPage(Pid) {
    db.transaction(function(tx) {
        tx.executeSql('SELECT * FROM Page WHERE Pid=' + Pid, [],
                    function(tx, results) {
            nextp = parseInt(results.rows.item(0).NextPage);
            //alert(nextp);
            return nextp;   
        }, errorCB);
    }, errorCBQuery);
}

if I use the alert-dialog in the called function, the variable nextp is 2. BUT if I return the variable, it will alert as 'undefined'. Also, if I etc make the variable var nextp = 11; over "db.transaction..." and the return-statement at the end of the function, it will return 11 instead of 2.

Is it because the variable is not sent to the inner function in my inception of functions? :)

Any ideas of what to do? thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know how SQLite in javascript works, but I suspect it works asynchronously, so you're calling alert in turnPage but the transaction is running async and the return value is in another scope anyway. You can try passing a callback function to getNextPage and then instead of returning nextp call the callback with nextp as argument:

function turnPage(){
    var current = window.now;
    getNextPage(current, function (nextp) { alert(nextp); /* do whatever else you need to do */ });
}



function getNextPage(Pid, cb) {
    db.transaction(function(tx) {
        tx.executeSql('SELECT * FROM Page WHERE Pid=' + Pid, [],
                    function(tx, results) {
            nextp = parseInt(results.rows.item(0).NextPage);
            cb(nextp);   
        }, errorCB);
    }, errorCBQuery);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thans, it worked! (If someone use this code, there is a typo in the alert, it should be alert(nextp), instead of alert(nextpage) –  TorK Mar 20 '12 at 11:30
    
gah, true. Fixed typo. –  axel_c Mar 20 '12 at 11:32
    
@user1255456 remember to accept the answer if it solved your problem. –  axel_c Mar 20 '12 at 11:51
    
yes forgot about it, done –  TorK Apr 4 '12 at 16:10

Your outer function never actuallay returns nextp at any time.

There are two solutions to what (I think) you are going to do

  1. Create a global variable and store the value of nextp there.
  2. Introduce another callback to use the value of nextp, e.g., create a new link or whatever. If you want, you can put the code either in another function and pass it as a parameter to getNextPage() or put the code directly into the most inner function (at the position of your alertcall).

Note that callbacks are used to handle the asynchronous nature of many JavaScript APIs. So even your getNextPage() can't return the value of the inner query as that value is not present, when getNextPage() is finished.

Anyway the return statement in the most inner function can be dropped as there is no function to actually receive that value.

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As it is now, there are several problems with your code.

  1. As JavaScript mostly is asynchronus, your code:

    nextpage = getNextPage(current);
    alert(nextpage);
    

    Will call getNextPage() but it will not wait for the response before moving on, so the alert will be fired right away, and at that point, if the response hasn't been returned and assigned (which is likely to be the case), then nextpage will be undefined.

  2. Your second problem is that your outer function does not return anything. You return the value from your inner function, but then "it get stuck" in your outer function. One solution would be to assign the value to a global variable, instead of returning it from the function. You would still have to look out for the "asynchronous-problem", so that you don't read the global variable until it has been assigned.

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