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I have been trying to read The Art of Multiprocessor Programming by Herlihy and Shavit. In the second chapter they motivate Peterson's algorithm with two incorrect lock implementations. I was trying to understand the problem with the LockTwo class and ended with the following code which deadlocks. A sample output is given after the code where the threads don't print all the values from 1 to 100 before deadlock. For deadlock to occur in either thread, the while(victim ==i){} has to run forever. But if both threads are running this loop then one of them has to exit because victim cannot be 0 and 1 at the same time. Am I missing something cache-related?

class Counter
{
    private int value;
    private int maxValue;
    public Counter(int value, int maxValue)
    {
        this.value = value;
        this.maxValue = maxValue;
    }

    public int getValue()
    {
        return value;
    }

    public int getMaxValue()
    {
        return maxValue;
    }

    public void incrementValue()
    {
        value++;
    }
}

class ThreadID 
{
  private static volatile int nextID = 0;
  private static ThreadLocalID threadID = new ThreadLocalID();

  public static int get() 
  {
    return threadID.get();
  }

  public static void reset() 
  {
    nextID = 0;
  }

  private static class ThreadLocalID extends ThreadLocal<Integer> 
  {
    protected synchronized Integer initialValue() 
    {
      return nextID++;
    }
  }
}

class IncrementThread implements Runnable
{
    private static Counter c = new Counter(0,100);
    private static LockTwo lock2 = new LockTwo();
    public IncrementThread()
    {
    }

    public void run()
    {
        int j = ThreadID.get();
        String m = "Thread ID " + j;
        //System.out.println(m);                        
        while(c.getValue() < c.getMaxValue())
        {
            lock2.lock();
            c.incrementValue();
            String s = "Value in counter is " + c.getValue() + " in thread " + j;
            System.out.println(s);                        
            lock2.unlock();
        }
    }
}

interface Lock
{
    public void lock();
    public void unlock();
}


class LockTwo implements Lock
{
    private int victim;
    public LockTwo() {};
    public void lock()
    {
        int i = ThreadID.get();
        victim = i;
        System.out.println("Trying to acquire lock in thread " + i +" with victim " + victim);
        while(victim == i) {} 
        System.out.println("Lock acquired in thread " + i + " with victim " + victim);
    }

    public void unlock()
    {
        int i = ThreadID.get();
        //victim = i;
        System.out.println("Lock released in thread " + i + " with victim " + victim);
    }
}

public class SharedCounter
{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
    {
        Thread thread[] = new Thread[2];
        for (int i = 0; i < thread.length; i++)
        {
            thread[i] = new Thread(new IncrementThread());
            thread[i].start();
        }
    }
}

Sample output $java SharedCounter

Trying to acquire lock in thread 0 with victim 1
Trying to acquire lock in thread 1 with victim 1
Lock acquired in thread 0 with victim 1
Value in counter is 1 in thread 0
Lock released in thread 0 with victim 1
Trying to acquire lock in thread 0 with victim 0
Lock acquired in thread 1 with victim 0
Value in counter is 2 in thread 1
Lock released in thread 1 with victim 0
Trying to acquire lock in thread 1 with victim 1
Lock acquired in thread 0 with victim 1
Value in counter is 3 in thread 0
Lock released in thread 0 with victim 1
Trying to acquire lock in thread 0 with victim 0
share|improve this question

I suspect the problem is that victim is not volatile.
Variables in java can be cached locally to the thread.

This means each thread has it's own view of victim, each with it's own id.
I.e. Thread 0 has victim == 0 and Thread1 has victim == 1

Using volatile tells the jvm that the variable will be used across threads and that it should not be cached.

share|improve this answer
1  
If the lack of the volatile keyword was the problem, the threads should deadlock immediately, they should never be able to increment the counter. But this does not happen. They deadlock after a few successful passes through the critical section. BTW, the LockTwo implementation in ArtofMP has the volatile keyword associated with victim but the errata asks that this keyword be removed. ArtofMP errata link – sarva Mar 20 '12 at 12:30
1  
@sarva So removing the volatile keyword still causes deadlocks? – Jim Mar 20 '12 at 12:39
1  
The code above (which does not have the volatile keyword) results in a deadlock. If I add the volatile keyword to victim, then there is a deadlock at the very end when one thread finishes executing by incrementing the counter to 100 and the other thread is waiting in while(victim == i) {} with no change in the value of victim. – sarva Mar 20 '12 at 12:51

This answer builds on Jim's answer, and the comments associated with it.

If the lack of the volatile keyword was the problem, the threads should deadlock immediately, they should never be able to increment the counter. -- sarva

This is incorrect, there are no way of guaranteeing when the written value will propagate to other threads.

BTW, the LockTwo implementation in ArtofMP has the volatile keyword associated with victim but the errata asks that this keyword be removed. -- sarva

This is only because consistency with the other algorithms presented in the same chapter. Pragma 2.3.1 says that victim, label and so on need to be declared volatile in practice -- but then victim is declared volatile in Figure 2.5 anyway.

If I add the volatile keyword to victim, then there is a deadlock at the very end when one thread finishes executing by incrementing the counter to 100 and the other thread is waiting in while(victim == i) {} with no change in the value of victim. -- sarva

This is the behavior you want. Consider a single-threaded program, the following lines from your program does not make sense then:

victim = i;
while (victim == i) {}

Without an additional thread, this will be an infinite loop.

We can get an essentially equivalent situation in a two-threaded program when only one of the threads tries to acquire the lock (i.e., call the lock method).

If both threads call the lock method, we get the behavior you observed where the deadlock occurs in the end:

  1. The first thread calls lock and sets victim to 0 and starts to loop
  2. The second thread calls lock and sets victim to 1, and starts to loop
  3. The first thread sees that victim now equals 1 and enters the critical section
  4. If the first thread never calls the lock method again, the second thread will be stuck in the loop forever, waiting for victim to become 1

So, the (in some sense) last call will not finish if both threads call the lock method multiple times each.

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