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I m new to regular expression , during learning i m confused in some basic , can you please interpret this expression

Query

SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('Having fun with', '([a-z])+', 'A') FROM dual;

Result:

HA A A

Query

SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE('Having fun with', '([a-z])*', 'A') FROM dual;

Result:

AHAA AA AA

I am unable to understand main difference between + and * as per these Queries and their results.

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* means any number of (i.e., zero or more), whereas + means at least one (i.e., one or more). You should read a primer on regular expressions. –  ladaghini Mar 20 '12 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

Not all regex engines work that way, but Oracle regex engine will allow an empty match to follow a match of non-0-width. However all regex engines should match at beginning of string.

  • Using vim, with 'noignorecase', :s/[a-z]*/A/g ==> AHA A A.
  • Using Perl, my $in = 'Having fun with'; $in =~ s/[a-z]*/A/g; ==> AHAA AA AA.

* is greedy and will try to match as many items as possible, just like +, but * allows 0 occurrences to match (ie, empty string).

The machine state is:

  • We are at beginning of string, we have a match, the greatest length possible is 0. H is not matched.
  • We are at position s+1, we have a match, the greatest length possible is 5 (aving).
  • We are at position s+6, we have a match, of length 0. <space> is not matched.
  • We are at position s+7, we have a match, of length 3 (fun)
  • We are at position s+10, we have a match, of length 0. <space> is not matched.
  • We are at position s+11, we have a match, of length 4 (with)
  • We are at position s+15 (end), we still have a match of length 0.
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Thanks you for your response –  azhar hussain Mar 21 '12 at 7:22

+ - matches 1 or more lower case letters. Ex. with matches in brackets: H[aving] [fun] [with]

* - matches 0 or more lower case letters. Ex: with matches (also empty strings) in brackets: []H[aving][] [fun][] [with][]

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Thanks for response –  azhar hussain Mar 21 '12 at 7:23
1  
No problem. Just don't forget to accept one of the answers.. :) –  barsju Mar 21 '12 at 7:46

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